[First appeared in Ghost in the Machine, 12/23/09 - 1/2/10.]

[Hello, all. Below is a reposting of my Top 100 Movies of the Oughts list, a project I embarked on over at GitM at the end of 2009. Other than formatting, a few movies added to the also-rans, and item #5 below, it remains unchanged from the original post. But, in case you missed the list earlier, here's all of it in one place. And, if you've never been 'round these parts before -- welcome! -- and want to read more, the movie reviews are collated here.]

A few caveats before I start:

  1. This is my list, obviously. Meaning these are the movies I enjoyed, cherished, or otherwise been entertained by over the past decade. So, if you vehemently disagree, that's cool, but that's just like your opinion, (wo)man.

  2. Movies are being judged -- in part -- on how well they succeed on their own terms. So, to take an example below, am I really saying that Drag Me to Hell (#79) is a better film than Brokeback Mountain (#80)? And I'm saying yes, it's either [a] more entertaining or [b] to my mind, accomplishes better what it sets out to do.This way, a really funny Z-grade comedy might just beat out an expensively manicured piece of Oscar bait. Ya never know.

  3. Since I've already posted extensive reviews of most of the movies here, I've gone ahead and included excerpts from those in the gray boxes for each film. Feel free to re-read or ignore these as you see fit.

  4. Speaking of those reviews, some of the movies below may do better or worse than they did in their respective end-of-year lists. Some move up, some move down, such is the passage of time.

  5. Waaaa! The decade has one more year! Uh, no, not really. These are the best 100 films of the Oughts: 2000 to 2009. 1960 is not part of "The Fifties," and 2010 is not part of the "Oughts." (It's the first-year of the "Twenty-Tens.") Trust me, it works.

  6. Finally, before we begin and in alphabetical order, some honorable mentions that didn't quite make the top 100 list, with brief explanations:

    The Almosts (in Alphabetical Order)

  • 4 Months, 3 Weeks, & 2 Days (2008): I probably should have found a place for this somewhere, but it just kept slipping, mainly because I couldn't imagine ever wanting to sit through it again. 4 Months is a very impressively-made movie, but I guess (like The Road) I flinch a little in the face of its unrelenting -- some might say one-note -- darkness.

  • The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007): Tiger Woods, meet Jesse James. Andrew Dominik's sprawling meta-western looks gorgeous (thanks to cinematographer Roger Deakins), and it definitely has truths to tell about the trials of celebrity in American life. It could stand to lose an hour, tho.

  • Casino Royale (2006): This one I've added after the fact, because, as you'll read, it kept coming up in some of the other entries. I like this new Bond quite a bit, and lord knows 007 needed a reboot. But it still just barely misses the list. (Blame the blatantly goofy poker sequences.)

  • The Constant Gardener (2005): Fernando Meirelles' City of God is topping a few of the Best-of-Decade lists I've seen out and about, but I'd be more inclined to put this, his follow-up film, somewhere on the list. Neither made it in the end, but, nonetheless, The Constant Gardener has its merits.

  • Dirty Pretty Things (2003): I originally had this as high as #74 on account of Chiwetel Ejiofor's breakout performance. But, although Ejiofor became one of the most consistently reliable actors of the decade, the rest of Stephen Frears' movie doesn't quite hold up enough to be counted in the end.

  • Gangs of New York (2002): What with Daniel Day-Lewis, Jim Broadbent, and few of the vignettes therein, there probably was a great movie in here somewhere. But the final version of Scorsese's Gangs has serious flaws -- not only major historical ones (see the original review) but cinematic ones too. Particularly with a fellow like Bill the Butcher stomping around, did anybody care one whit about Leo DiCaprio's character? Not me.

  • Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle (2004): As I said at #92, this almost made the list. It's smart, it's funny, and it's more Ought-ish in its multicultural, Age-of-Obama outlook than a lot of movies that actually made it on here. But, it slipped. Sorry, y'all.

  • I am Legend (2007): I loved the "Man and his Dog" part of this movie -- it hit me where I lived. The not-so-scary CGI-beasties, not-so-much. The director's cut ending helped resolve some of the movie's second-half problems, but still not quite good enough to crack the century mark.

  • Man on Wire (2008): A bit of a one-trick pony. Amazing trick, definitely. But, there it is.

  • Oldboy (2003): When it was good -- please, hammer, don't hurt 'em -- it was very good. When it wasn't, it was wayyy over the top.

  • Snow Angels (2008): David Gordon Green's movie has grown in my memory in the year since I saw it, but I still couldn't find room for it.

  • There Will Be Blood (2007): In previewing this list on some film boards, I got more grief for not including TWBB somewhere in the mix than any other movie that came up. But, while there are other films that made my list on the basis of a strong first or second half (WALL-E comes to mind), I thought the slippage was too great from Blood's astonishing first hour to its meandering second to its ludicrous close. So it's only on the coulda-been-a-contender list. Still, it was a step up for PTA, so maybe next time.

  • The Virgin Suicides (2000): I remember Sofia Coppola's dream-like vision of Jeffrey Eugenides' book to be pretty on the nose, and it boasts a great soundtrack. If I saw it again, it might move up, but as with a lot of the early-decade movies, I'm mostly going on memory, and my memory was that the book didn't translate to film so well.

  • The Visitor (2008): The better of Tom McCarthy's two writer-director projects thus far (the other being The Station Agent), this movie was a bit too cloying in the beatific immigrant regard to make the century list. Richard Jenkins was really great, tho.

And now, the real list. Here we go...

My Top 100 Films of the Decade

[The Rest of the List: 100-76 | 75-51 | 50-26 | 25-11 | 10-1]

100. Dave Chappelle's Block Party (2006)

From the original review: "[I]t's hard to come up with a better 'first-day-of-spring' movie than th[is] wickedly funny, rousingly optimistic hip-hop concert flick...Block Party bounces with cool, infectious verve and power-to-the-people, DIY exhilaration...Chappelle's wry irreverence and broad, encompassing good humor are contagious. Often, it seems, he can't believe his luck at becoming the jester-king of Brooklyn for a day, and he grounds and permeates the film with his antic enthusiasm and sardonic, puckish charm."

From the year-end list: "With performances by some of the most innovative and inspired players in current hip-hop (Kanye, Mos Def, The Roots, The Fugees, Erykah Badu), and presided over by the impish, unsinkable Chappelle, Block Party was one of the best concert films in recent memory, and simply more fun than you can shake a stick at."

A case could be made that Michel Gondry's Dave Chappelle's Block Party should be even higher on this list -- Few movie experiences of the decade were as out-and-out pleasurable as my spring afternoon viewing of this flick. That being said, Block Party seemed like a good way to kick off this best-of-decade list -- It's just a happy, goofy, groovy, fun movie, teeming with great music, optimism, and the open possibilities of any given day. Particularly if you have any affinity for hip-hop, give it a whirl.

99. Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith (2005)

From the original review: "Well, that was a happy surprise. Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith is by no means a perfect film. But, the reviews are right -- this one's miles above the other two prequels, and definitely can be considered in the same breath as Jedi. Sure, there's a bad movie occasionally lingering in the shadows like a Sith, but for the most part this entry manages to capture some of that ole Star Wars feel."

From the year-end list: "Thank the Force for small kindnesses: George Lucas put the Star Wars universe to bed with far and away his best outing of the prequels. The film flirts dangerously with the Dark Side, particularly in the 'let's take a meeting' second act, but for the most part Sith felt -- finally -- like a return to that galaxy long ago and far, far away."

How George got his groove back. In a perfect world, the Star Wars prequels would've carried some of the vim and verve of Peter Jackson's LotR trilogy or the first Matrix. Alas, as you all know, that didn't happen. Like many SW fans of my generation, I walked out of 1999's middling The Phantom Menace confused about where George Lucas was intending to go with all this, and desperately trying to convince myself that, Jar Jar Binks, midichlorians, and pod racing notwithstanding, I'd just sat through a really good movie. (The still-very-good Maul/Obi-Wan/Qui-Gon duel helped a good bit with the denial.)

Alas, the atrocious Attack of the Clones of 2002, the pre-Clone Wars nadir of the Star Wars franchise (Holiday Special notwithstanding), put that reverie to bed. Something terrible had happened -- disastrous, even. All across America, millions of fanboy and fangirl voices suddenly cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced.

But, with expectations suitably lowered, then came Sith in 2005, which at least carried some small glimmers of the old magic. I won't try to defend the film's many faults -- they're there, all right. But every so often during Sith, you could feel something, as if Lucas had finally managed to take his first step back into a larger world.

98. Unbreakable (2000)

From the year-end list: "A little slower than I would have liked, and it had no second act, but this languid, contemplative film spoke to the comic fan in me."

It seems weird from the perspective of 2009, after drek like Signs and The Village. (I didn't see Lady in the Water or The Happening, but...I've heard bad things). Nonetheless, back in 2000, M. Night Shyamalan still seemed like he had the potential to be a first-rate genre filmmaker, maybe even the new Spielberg. True, 1999's The Sixth Sense ended up being massively overhyped -- Due mainly to box office, one presumes, it even bypassed The Matrix, Being John Malkovich, Three Kings, and Fight Club for an Oscar nod. But it still came out of nowhere to make for a surprising and unsettling ghost story that year.

And, belying the usual curse (that would come later, in spades), Shyamalan turned out a quality sophomore follow-up in Unbreakable. I haven't seen the movie since it came out, but I still remember it as a unique take on the superhero origin story in a decade that would be full of them. True, the Mr. Glass monologuing at the end should have telegraphed to us Shyamalan's overreliance on the 11th-hour plot twist. But that wouldn't really come to seem a problem until later films. As it was, Unbreakable showed that M. Night wasn't afraid to follow-up a box-office monster with a movie that felt quite different in tone, and it suggested -- probably wrongly, it turns out -- that he might have a few more tricks up his sleeve after "I see Dead People."

97. Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006)

From the original review: "I don't really feel the inclination to write the usual three-paragraph review for I'll just leave it at this: It's really funny...[U]nless you're offended by ridiculously over-the-top anti-semitism or have a problem with truly grotesque displays of male nudity, you should find it verrry nice. (But leave the gypsys at home.)"

From the year-end list: "True, the frighteningly talented Sasha Baron Cohen spends a lot of time in this movie shooting fish in a barrel, and I wish he'd spent a little more time eviscerating subtler flaws in the American character than just knuckle-dragging racists and fratboy sexists. Still, the journeys of Borat Sagdiyev through the Bible Buckle and beyond made for far and away the funniest movie of the year."

The Cotton Kingdom of the Dubya era. I had this quite a bit further up the list at first, but decided to switch it out with one of its memorable antecedents. (More on that demented travesty later.)

I missed Bruno this year, so I don't know how it compares. Still, Borat has slipped quite a bit from its 2006 ranking, if only because [a] I'm not sure a lot of the comedy holds up on repeat viewings, and [b] I still think Cohen went for mostly easy targets here. In its picking off the low-hanging fruit in the Red States -- bible-thumpers, rednecks, and whatnot -- the movie also feels very much an artifact of the post-2004 election grimness. Although, now that I think about it, a strong case could be made that Cohen was just prepping us for the teabagger vanguard.

96. The Quiet American (2002)

From the original review: "All in all, very well done, and a battered, despairing Michael Caine deserves an Oscar for this much more than he ever did for his turn in the schlocky Cider House Rules."

From the year-end list: "A bit by-the-numbers, perhaps, but Phillip Noyce's take on Graham Greene's novel was blessed with timeliness and two great performances by Michael Caine and Brendan Fraser, both of whom expertly exemplified their homelands' diplomatic tendencies without becoming overly tendentious."

I watched about half an hour of The Quiet American again a few weeks ago while flipping through the channels, and I still think it has a bit too much of an austere, "from-the-classic-novel" feel to it, the sort of movie one might be forced to watch in a high school class (be it English or History). Still, it's very well-done, Caine and Fraser are both exceedingly well cast, and you could do worse as a quality intro to our blundering in Vietnam than Graham Greene's ripe and pungent allegory here.

95. The Savages (2007)

From the original review: "[W]hat Six Feet Under is to dying, The Savages is to the final stages of aging. It's something we don't really want to think about, but it's there, somewhere over the last ridge. If we're going to dwell on this subject, it's probably best to confront that fact with the mordant humor of [this film] (while keeping in mind that, however inevitable that final end, it's never too late to teach an old dog some new tricks.)"

From the year-end list: "[F]ew other movie endings this year hit me in the gut quite like this one...[T]his comedy about an ornery lion in winter, and the battling cubs who have to come to his aid, is a worthwhile one, and particularly if you're in the mood for some rather black humor. As Lenny the senescent and slipping paterfamilias, Philip Bosco gives a standout performance, as does Hoffman as the miserable Bertholdt Brecht scholar trapped in deepest, darkest Buffalo."

Tamara Jenkins' The Savages is an uneven film, and at times it gets overwhelmed by its televisionish tendencies (be they sitcom or Lifetime movie-of-the-week-oriented.) But when it's on, it's on, and it's a film that's stuck with me in the two years since I caught it on the back-end of an Angelika double-bill (along with another mortality-drenched movie further down the list.) I still have some issues with its Bagger Vancing of The Wire's Gbenga Akinnagbe, but in its depictions of siblings, senescence, and seriously bummed-out academics, The Savages rings true.

94. About a Boy (2002)

From the original review: "[W]hile it was quite good for its genre (and Hugh Grant was surprisingly palatable), I do have some problems with its underlying premises...Since when is one's identity primarily formed by holding down a job you hate?...I don't remember the protagonist of Hornby's book being nearly so shattered by his presumed nothingness."

From the year-end list: "A surprisingly good translation of Nick Hornby's third book. A bit fluffy, perhaps, and...I'm not sure how I feel about some of the underlying premises, but very well done nonetheless. After all, making both Hugh Grant and a precocious young British lad palatable at the same time is no easy task."

Now this one to me is almost exactly the opposite of The Savages, in that -- more than any other film on this list -- I can barely remember About a Boy at all, other than Toni Collette being very good, the kid (Nicholas Hoult, soon of A Single Man and Clash of the Titans) also being quite solid, and Hugh Grant singing acapella, drinking a lot of Red Bull, and somehow magically not getting on my nerves. And because of this memory hole, I came very close to putting another very similar-feeling Weitz production, In Good Company, here instead. But just because the high has mostly evaporated doesn't mean the initial experience wasn't grand. So I'm trusting my notes here somewhat (which had About a Boy at #3 for 2002) and putting it here at #94. Hopefully, I know what I'm talking about.

93. The Matrix: Reloaded (2003)

From the original review: "To be sure, the first forty minutes of the film, including everything that takes place in Zion, is almost unwatchable...But, right about the time Neo gets a call from the Oracle and reenters the Matrix in Chinatown...the film finally starts to find its rhythm...Alas, Neo and Trinity still don't really work as an onscreen couple, but most of the action setpieces are breathtaking (particularly the highway chase and truck the midst of all the new characters showing up, it's nice to see the Agents still getting their due.) And as expected, Hugo Weaving is just wicked good fun as Agents Smith...they steal every scene they're in."

From the year-end list: "I won't defend the first forty-five minutes or the ridiculous rave scene. But, right about the time Hugo Weaving showed up to do what he does best, Revolutions found a new gear that it maintained right up until the arc-twisting Architect monologues at the end. And, as far as action sequences go, it's hard to beat the visceral thrill of the 14-minute highway chase."

I can envision getting some grief for this one, but what I said in these two reviews stand. As a whole, this first sequel to 1999's The Matrix has serious problems in its first hour -- I'm looking at you, Bacardi-Benetton rave. But once you get to the (now rather dated looking) "Burly Brawl," (i.e. Neo vs. a legion of Smiths) The Matrix: Reloaded kicks it up a notch.

Sure, nothing could match the initial shock of seeing Neo wake up in that gooey biopod in the first movie -- That was the first indicator that the heretofore unknown Wachowski brothers (Bound notwithstanding) were really playing on a broad canvas here. But from the Burly Brawl on -- through the Merovingian and Swiss Chalet stuff, the albino Milli Vanilli twins, the highway chase, and on to the Architect's rambling in the final moments, Reloaded is easily as propulsive and occasionally mind-bending as the second half of the first film. (And, without a doubt, it's far better than the woeful Matrix: Revolutions, out later that year.)

92. L'Auberge Espagnole (2003)

From the original review: "L'Auberge was funnier, sexier, and more intelligent than any of the assorted American Pies or their ilk...This movie seems to understand that it's possible to capture the joys of youth and friendship without resorting to a constant stream of lame, mostly unfunny gross-out jokes."

From the year-end list: "[W]hile Lost in Translation trafficked in existential detachment, L'Auberge Espagnole showed the fun Scarlett Johannson could've been having, if she'd just lighten up and get out of the hotel once in awhile. This paean to the pan-Continental culture of the EU captured the excitement and possibilities of youth in a way that was both sexier and funnier than any of the teen shock-schlock emanating from our own side of the pond. Road Trippers, take a gander."

Now, having roundly derided domestic gross-out comedies, I should say that I just came very close to pulling an audible and putting the very funny Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle in this spot. (Sorry guys, you got screwed. A few Sliders should help ease the pain.) Nonetheless, L'Auberge Espagnole is a jaunty European escapade that matched the sexy frankness of Y Tu Mama Tambien (minus its existential pretensions -- remember that goofy car crash?) with the joy and possibility of foreign travel you find in, say, Before Sunrise. I remember seeing this flick on a dismal date, and even that couldn't diminish the experience. Salut.

91. King Kong (2005)

From the original review: "In essence PJ's King Kong is the Mother of All B-Films -- the Skull Island action sequences are spectacular, Kong's adventures in New York seem appropriately mythic, the special effects throughout (particularly the Great Ape himself) are mind-blowing...[But] the film has some serious pacing problems, particularly in the first hour, and at times I thought it seemed almost too reverent of its source material. At the very least, Kong, while definitely a Wonder of the World and no mistake, could have benefited from some minor grooming."

From the year-end list: "I had this film as high as #2 for awhile, and there are visual marvels therein that no other movie this year came close to offering, most notably Kong loose in Depression-Era New York City. But, there's no way around it -- even given all the B-movie thrills and great-ape-empathizing that PJ offers in the last 120 minutes, the first hour is close to terrible, which has to knock the gorilla down a few notches."

Yep, that about covers it. Like The Matrix: Reloaded a few spots ago, King Kong is an eye-popping visual feast that ultimately falls several steps shy of greatness thanks to all the excess baggage on the front end. I don't have much of an attachment to the 1933 version (or the 1976 Jeff Bridges/Jessica Lange/Charles Grodin version for that matter, although Lange looks stunning in it), but almost all of the Kong-in-NYC stuff in PJ's version is marvelous, give or take the ice-skating, and feels like something ripped from the pages of myth.

That being said, it feels like we're on Skull Island for a really long time in this Kong, and that doesn't even get into all the deadly dull happenings before they even reach the King's domain. For all its strengths, this Kong is too self-indulgent to go down as one of the decade's greats. It's clearly a labor of love by PJ (and he earned it after knocking LotR out of the park), but the movie would've benefited from quite a bit more tough love at some point in the process.

90. Capote (2005)

From the original review: "[A] somber and compelling character study of the eponymous author...Hoffman's Capote cuts a complex and striking figure that's hard to take your eyes from -- He's at once vainglorious and needy, extroverted and remote, compassionate and manipulative, convivial and detestable."

From the year-end list: "I think it'd be awhile before I want to watch this movie again, but, still, it was a dark, memorable trip into bleeding Kansas and the writerly id."

"Every artist is a cannibal. Every poet is a thief. All kill their inspiration and sing about their grief." In fact, I haven't seen Capote since it came out in 2005 (nor did I ever see Infamous, with the Trumanesque Toby Jones.) But the moral darkness of this film lingers, as does Clifton Collins, Jr.'s haunting portrayal of Perry Edward Smith, who, to Capote, is both the Spider and the Fly.

89. Star Trek (2009)

From the original review: "Blessed with a charismatic and appealing cast that smooths over much of the choppy writing turbulence therein, Abrams' Trek reboot isn't only a rousing, over-the-top, sometimes patently absurd space opera that borrows as much from Lucas' original trilogy as it does from its erstwhile source material -- It's also probably the best of the Star Wars prequels. The more I've thought about it over the past few days, the less sense the movie makes, and the more and more shamelessly derivative Trek seems. But darned if I didn't have a good time during the Big Show itself, which, of course, is what really matters in the end."

From the year-end list: "There was admittedly a whole lotta stupid in J.J. Abrams' Star Warsy revamp of the Star Trek franchise -- Once exposed to the light, the movie's basic premises completely fall apart. But, like the stomachache that accompanies eating too much candy, those regrets come later. In the moment, Star Trek was more fun than you can shake a stick at, and as solid and entertaining a franchise reboot as 2006's Casino Royale."

Sure, it's a cotton candy movie, but, like I said, Star Trek had more of that Star Wars magic than any of the prequels, including Sith. I haven't seen Trek again since that first time in the theater, and it's entirely possible a lot of the general dumbness of the movie -- Spock hanging 'round the ice cave, all the nonsensical red matter/black hole stuff -- will weigh everything down more on a second viewing. Still, it was definitely fun that first go. Bring on Javier Bardem as Khan.

88. Inside Man (2006)

From the original review: "Hearkening to the halcyon days of Dog Day Afternoon and Serpico, Spike Lee's Inside Man is a clever contraption indeed -- a sleek, intelligent, well-acted NYC heist flick whose central scheme is more about subterfuge, cunning, and misdirection than technical gimmickry. (In too many films in the genre -- The Score, or Ocean's 11, for example -- the robbers seem to be spending more on state-of-the-art equipment than they'd actually make in the grift.)...True, some of the plot mechanics in Inside Man could be considered contrived, but, Jodie Foster's corporate ninja notwithstanding, at least here the people seem real."

From the year-end list: "[A] fun, expertly-made crime procedural, as good in its own way as the much more heavily-touted Departed. It was also, without wearing it on its sleeve, the film Crash should have been -- a savvy look at contemporary race relations that showed there are many more varied and interesting interactions between people of different ethnicities than simply 'crashing' into each other. (But perhaps that's how y'all roll over in car-culture LA.)...Inside Man is a rousing New York-centric cops-and-robbers pic in the manner of Dog Day Afternoon or The Taking of the Pelham One Two Three, and it's definitely one of the more enjoyable movie experiences of the year."

I love it when a plan comes together. In a decade that sometimes seemed full of them, Spike Lee's crisp, no-nonsense Inside Man was one of the most purely entertaining heist movies of the oughts. And with primo talent like Willem DeFoe and Chiwetel Ejiofor working as support, you know you have an A-list cast on your hands.

To be honest, his von Trapp roots notwithstanding, Christopher Plummer seemed a bit young to be plausible as a ex-Nazi in the 21st century. (Max Von Sydow might've worked, I guess, but he also was born in 1929.) But take that -- and Foster's Fixer -- with a grain of salt, and Inside Man made for a great afternoon at the movies. It was a seventies cop yarn set in 21st-century Gotham, expertly assembled by one of NYC's great directors.

87. Munich (2005)

From the original review: "Munich is a movie well worth-seeing, the rare thriller that's not afraid to grapple with today's thorniest political questions, and without insulting the audience's intelligence by giving easy, simple-minded answers to seemingly insoluble problems. The film may at best be a long triple, but, to his credit, at least Spielberg is swinging for the fences."

True, Steven Spielberg's Munich includes some major missteps. I still wince when I remember Eric Bana and a pregnant Ayelet Zurer trysting while the Munich kidnappings go south. (The only equally terrible sex scene I can think of offhand would be Patrick Wilson, Malin Ackerman, and Leonard Cohen's "Hallelujah" in Watchmen.) Nonetheless, Munich was a decently compelling thriller with its heart in the right place and an important message to convey in these dark times: An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.

The memorable last shot of the film, with the World Trade Center in the background, suggested that Munich was also intended as a pointed response to our foreign policy, post-9/11. But, of course, given how we ended up in Iraq soon after 9/11, a closer movie parallel would have shown Israel responding to the 1972 Olympics massacre by killing a bunch of random Belgians.

86. Meet the Parents (2000)

From the year-end list: "[S]urprisingly good. I expected schlock, and got a genuinely funny fall film."

I didn't see the sequel (Meet the Fockers), and definitely don't plan to see the threequel (Little Fockers), which is on the dock for next year. But I remember Meet the Parents being a pretty quality time at the movies, all in all. (FWIW, other than Robert DeNiro generally hamming it up by trading in on his Taxi Driver cachet, the scene that first comes to mind these days is the water polo scene involving Owen Wilson and a slow-motion spike.) Maybe Noah Baumbach can give him a lift in next year's Greenberg, but, as it is, this was also as funny as Ben Stiller got all decade.

85. Sin City (2005)

From the original review: "Forgive me, Father, for I have sinned...and, whatsmore, I liked it. Without a shred of redeeming social value, Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez's Sin City is a film very noir. It's a sick, depraved, and smutty ride into a crime-ridden hellhole of a metropolis, exactly as it should be...Sin City turned out to be a visual marvel and easily Rodriguez' best film since El Mariachi."

From the year-end list: "One of the most faithful comic-to-film adaptations on celluloid also made for one of the more engaging and visually arresting cinematic trips this year. I don't know if the look and feel of Sin City can sustain a bona fide franchise, but this first outing was a surprisingly worthwhile film experience (with particular kudos for Mickey Rourke's Marv.)"

The movie that anticipated Mickey Rourke's later Wrestler resurgence, Sin City was a crazy-sexy-cool stylistic experiment that remains the best thing Robert Rodriguez has ever been involved with. I missed The Spirit, which obviously went for a very similar look, and from everything I hear that was probably for the best. But in a perfect world, this is what Warren Beatty's Dick Tracy would have looked like back in 1990.

84. Bloody Sunday (2002)

Bloody Sunday was the first of many great movies made by Paul Greengrass in the Oughts, and it ably showed off the hyperreal, you-are-there documentary style he'd use to such great effect throughout the decade. True, it's as yet unclear whether Greengrass has any other trick in his stylebook: Both of his forthcoming movies -- Green Zone (Bourne IV, basically) and They Marched in Sunlight (on Vietnam-era protests) -- sound very close to his previous projects, in terms of lending themselves to this hi-def documentarian conceit. Still, it's a neat trick alright, and one I never grew tired of from Bloody Sunday on.

83. The Squid and the Whale (2005)

From the original review: "The movie is mostly episodic vignettes in the life of a broken family and at times suggests a more misanthropic Me, You, and Everyone We Know. But it also feels scarily authentic and is probably one of the most convincing -- and wryly funny -- depictions of divorce I've ever seen on film, with particular kudos going to Jeff Daniels as the sad sack father in this outfit."

From the year-end list: "The Squid and the Whale made ugly, embittered divorce about as funny as ever it's likely to get, thanks to Jeff Daniels' turn as the pretentious, haunted Bernard Berkman."

He went off the rails a bit with 2007's Margot at the Wedding, but Noah Baumbach (also the co-writer of The Fantastic Mr. Fox and a few other Wes Anderson projects) struck inky black gold with The Squid and the Whale, loosely based on his semi-famous parents' smash-up. Squid is a bit broad at times -- I'm thinking of Billy Baldwin's tennis instructor in particular -- but Jeff Daniels' Oscar-overlooked performance as the poster child for pretentious (and miserable) academics makes up for a lot of mistakes.

82. Primer (2004)

From the original review: "We never really understand what's going on, and I could see some folks getting frustrated with this film -- usually, incomprehensibility is not a strong suit in movies. Still, for some reason, Primer works as a heady sci-fi tone poem about the cryptic (and dire) consequences of mucking about with the timestream. Mostly unfathomable, sure, but if you're a fan of the genre, it's definitely worth catching sometime...perhaps yesterday."

From the year-end list: "A completely inscrutable sci-fi tone poem on the perils of time travel. Kevin and I saw it twice and still have very little clue as to what's going most of the time -- but I (we?) mean that in the best way possible"

2009's Paranormal Activity made the bigger box-office splash this decade, but Shane Carruth's Primer was the original no-budget movie that could. A weird and trippy little number alright, Primer once again proved that smart ideas usually trump expensive FX when it comes to memorable sci-fi, even when those ideas are devilishly complicated. Who knows? If I ever write one, it might make my best of the Nineties list too.

81. American Psycho (2000)

Before Christian Bale was the Dark Knight, he made his (adult) name as another deeply nutty rich fella. Mary Harron's jet-black satire of '80s yuppie-dom, American Psycho, is one of those rare adaptations that improves on the source material (in this case, a rather lousy book by Bret Easton Ellis) in pretty much every way. It's ultimately a slasher flick, sure, but from disquisitions on the Huey Lewis back-catalog to the high-stakes status war of business card fonts, there's a lot of humor to be had amid the slaughter. And to his credit Bale, displaying the intensity he'd henceforth be known for both on-screen and off-, just goes for it, naked chainsawing and all.

80. Brokeback Mountain (2005)

From the original review: "Heath Ledger's performance is engrossing, in part because you spend much of the film just trying to figure out what he's thinking. At times, his character is taciturn to the point of being inarticulate. This speaks in favor of the film's realism, I suppose -- Ennis's whole life after Brokeback is about caution, misdirection, and concealment....At the same time, though, Ledger seems like he's underplaying an underwritten character...And that's ultimately the modest problem with Brokeback Mountain, which is otherwise an excellent film -- at times, it feels as somber, restrained, and delicate as Kabuki theater. Particularly in a film that warns of the dangers of bottling up passion, it'd be nice to have seen less Big Sky Country pageantry and more emotion from all the characters on-screen. If that wouldn't have played in Peoria, so be it."

From the year-end list: "A beautifully shot and beautifully told love story, although admittedly Ang Lee's staid Brokeback at times feels like transparent Oscar bait."

If "the Batman" broke out of the Newsies ghetto with American Psycho, the portrayer of his eventual arch-nemesis moved into the A-list with this Ang Lee romance. With its breathtaking Wyoming vistas, Brokeback looks amazing, and it has moments of real grace (like the haunting closing moment.) But, as J. Hoberman so well put it, this was also the "straightest love story since Titanic" Even more than Jonathan Demme's Philadelphia, Brokeback seems like it won't age very well. And, even if bottled-up passion is Ang Lee's usual m.o., the movie's demureness seems less an artistic choice than a product of its time, particularly when put up against Gus Van Sant's more vibrant Milk, made only a few years later.

79. Drag Me to Hell (2009)

From the original review: "A loving throwback to the director's Evil Dead days, and an audience film if there ever was one, [it] delivers a solidly entertaining two hours of low-budge comic mayhem, if you're in the mood for it. It doesn't really aspire to be anything more than what it is -- a B-movie carnival funhouse. But taken as such, Drag Me to Hell offers thrills, chills, and (gross-out) spills with plenty of Raimi's old-school tongue-in-cheek."

From the year-end list: "Besides being easily the most explicitly anti-gypsy film since Borat, Drag Me to Hell was also, in its own way, as much of a Great Recession cautionary tale as Up in the Air. One hopes that when the Senate takes up financial services reform next year, our erstwhile reformers in that esteemed body will note what happened to Alison Lohman when she, against all better judgment, decided to do the bidding of the Banks"

Drag Me to Hell isn't up to the caliber of Sam Raimi's magnum opus, Evil Dead 2. But it's in the same goofy-scary key, even without Bruce Campbell around this time. Basically Drag Me to Hell works because it's unabashedly no more or less than what it aspires to be -- a fun, turn-your-brain-off, midnight B-movie. And taken as such, it's pretty darned entertaining.

78. Michael Clayton (2007)

From the original review: "An intelligent, well-made throwback to the conspiracy-minded thrillers of the 1970s (such as The Parallax View and Three Days of the Condor), first-time director Tony Gilroy's Michael Clayton is a withering and mostly plausible excursion into the ethical dead zone that can emerge at the top levels of the money game...It's an adult, believable thriller that's well worth checking out, and George Clooney, as per the norm, is excellent."

From the year-end list: "Clooney's impeccable taste in projects continues with this, Tony Gilroy's meditation on corporate malfeasance and lawyerly ethics (or lack thereof.)...A small film, in its way, but a worthwhile one."

Here's a movie that one could argue should be higher on the list. A study in grays, Tony Gilroy's Michael Clayton is an adult movie about conspiracy and compromise that has a lot going in its favor, including a solid anchoring performance by George Clooney and great work in the margins by Tom Wilkinson, Danny O'Keefe, and the late Sydney Pollack. I take off points for the convenient business with the horses and some of the artsy kerfuffling surrounding Tilda Swinton's character, but Michael Clayton is nonetheless a very good film.

77. The Fountain (2006)

From the original review: "I found it a bit broad at times, particularly in the early going, and I definitely had to make a conscious decision to run with it. That being said, I thought The Fountain ultimately pays considerable dividends as a stylish, imaginative, and melancholy celebration of the inexorable cycle of life, from birth to death ad infinitum...I'm not sure you'll like it -- it's very possible you'll love it -- but I'm willing to bet, either way, that it'll stick with you."

From the year-end list: "Darren Aronofsky's elegiac ode to mortality and devotion was perhaps the most unfairly maligned movie of the year...Clearly a heartfelt and deeply personal labor of love, The Fountain -- admittedly clunky in his first half hour -- was a visually memorable tone poem that reminds us that all things -- perhaps especially the most beautiful -- are finite, so treasure them while you can."

Here's another one I haven't seen since that first screening in 2006, and I have a suspicion my positive reaction may not hold up so much on a second viewing. (Sitting next to Famke Janssen generally makes a movie seem better, no doubt.) Still, I admire The Fountain for what it tried to do, even if it doesn't all quite work at times. There's something to be said for a movie that so nakedly wears its heart on its sleeve.

76. The Fog of War (2003)

From the original review: "As a documentary, The Fog of War sometimes gets clouded by its own cinematic devices...[but] the film works best when it's simply an engaging monologue by an intelligent, evasive, and often frustrating Cold Warrior as he muses over a life perhaps not-so-well lived. "

From the year-end list: "[A] spry McNamara succeeds in penetrating the fog of time to examine how he himself became lost in the maze-like logic of war. If you can withstand the frequent Phillip Glass-scored barrages, it's worth a see."

Robert McNamara may have left us this past July, but his ghost haunts us still. The Oughts saw America engaged in two long wars that have moved in directions their planners did not intend or anticipate, and that we continue to wage this very moment. And, like almost all wars in human history, they've both been easier to start than finish. With another conflagration on his mind, T.S. Eliot once wrote: "Between the Idea and the Reality falls the Shadow." Well, as McNamara and Errol Morris remind us here, when it comes to conflict, Between the Planning and the Execution lies The Fog of War. It's something we'd do well to remember in the decade to come.

75. The Queen (2006)

From the original review: "Less a paean to 'the people's princess' than a sharp-witted rumination on changing social values and the effect of global 'Oprahization' on contemporary politics, The Queen is an intelligent, discerning and enjoyable slice-of-life that's well worth catching."

From the year-end list: "A movie I shied away from when it first came out, The Queen is a canny look at contemporary politics anchored by Helen Mirren's sterling performance as the fastidious, reserved, and ever-so-slightly downcast monarch in question...[It's] the type of movie I wish we saw more often: a small, tightly focused film about a very specific moment in recent history."

Unfortunately, this movie came out in 2006, so we don't get to see Elizabeth II here with her Wii (and a gold-plated one at that.) That aside, Peter Morgan, Stephen Frears, Michael Sheen, and particularly Helen Mirren made The Queen a memorable and multi-faceted disquisition on changing social mores and their respective political impact on the residents of Buckingham Palace and 10 Downing St. Morgan and Sheen would continue to expose the real stories behind various famous television interviews throughout the rest of the decade, in 2008's Frost/Nixon and 2009's The Damned United. All three are worthwhile films, but The Queen is probably the best of the lot.

74. Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy (2004)

Boy, that escalated quickly...I didn't quote from the original review on this one, because, basically, I whiffed it. I originally saw Anchorman one afternoon in the summer of 2004, soon after a recent dumping, and I clearly wasn't in the mood for it -- Funny is a fragile thing.

That being said, catching it on cable a few years later when not in Debbie Downer mode, Anchorman really came into its own for me. Basically, it's a movie that will try just about anything to make you laugh, and you have to sorta admire its ambition to leave no joke untried. While I know Talladega Nights has its defenders, this eventually ended up being my favorite Will Ferrell movie of the decade. What can I say? 60% of the time, it works every time.

73. U2 3D (2008)

From the original review: "Anyone who's ever thrown in The Joshua Tree -- that's millions of people, obviously -- and listened to the thrilling opening strands of "Where the Streets Have No Name" can probably imagine the potential of U2 filtered through an IMAX sound system and projected in multiple dimensions. All I can say, it's pretty darned cool...U2 3D really feels like the future in concert films. As a music experience, it's better than having the best seats in the house (and the drunk girl on her boyfriend's shoulders in front of you -- while in 3D -- never actually obscures your vision."

From the year-end list: "U2 3D was both a decently rousing concert performance by Dublin's fab four, and -- more importantly -- an experimental film which played with an entirely new cinema syntax. Just as students look back on D.W. Griffith films of a century ago as the beginnings of 2D-movie expression, so too might future generations look at this lowly U2 concert and see, in its layering of unrelated images onto one field of vision, when the language of 3D really began to take off. At which point someone might also say, 'Man, I wish they'd played 'So Cruel' instead of some of these tired old dogs.'"

Of course, your enjoyment of this concert film will depend a great deal on how much you like U2 -- For my part, they're not in my personal top tier, but I've always had a solid appreciation for them. Nonetheless, as I said above, U23D -- even more than the beautiful but ultimately pretty conventional Avatar -- still feels like a significant step forward for the art of movie-making. It's the only film I've ever seen that uses 3D-technology as a new visual language rather than just a gimmick. And, rather than another umpteen variations on "OMG that arrow is coming right at me!", I'd really like to see more filmmakers play with the 3D syntax tested out here in the decade to come.

72. Ocean's Twelve (2004)

From the original review: "Nonsensical, self-indulgent, and occasionally even a tad smarmy, Steven Soderbergh's much-hyped Ocean's Twelve is also, I'm happy to report, just plain fun...Twelve turned out to be what Soderbergh tried and failed to do with Full Frontal...As much a riff on stars and stardom as the heist movie we were all expecting, it's probably the most sheerly pleasurable film experience you're going to find this side of The Incredibles."

From the year-end list: "Two swollen hours of Soderberghian glamour and inside baseball. Not everyone's cup of tea, I know, but I found it an agreeable improvement on Ocean's 11."

I'm betting this will be another contested choice, as I've even seen Ocean's Twelve on a few worst-of-decade lists. But while the other two Ocean films are basically just standard-issue heist flicks, I thought this one aimed a little more outside the box, instead trying to amplify the "hanging with the Rat Pack" aspect of the original 1960 film. In short, I just love the sprawling movie metaness of Ocean's 12: the characters talking about Miller's Crossing; Topher Grace "totally phoning in that Dennis Quaid movie"; Eddie Izzard's cliched hot secretary; the gymnast getting lost in the luggage. And, yes, the Julia Roberts-Bruce Willis bit.

Sorta like Grant Heslov's The Men Who Stare at Goats, Ocean's 12 just feels like a Hollywood lark, one in which the ultra-glamorous movie stars in tow have kindly allowed us to come along for the ride, maybe play a few hands. I guess a lot of people didn't vibe into Twelve like I did, but I found its jaunty, devil-may-care sense of fun contagious.

71. In the Valley of Elah (2007)

From the original review: "I went in expecting not much more than an over-the-top 'message movie' schmaltzfest, or at best a harmless helping of mediocre, inert Oscar Bait like Cinderella Man or A Beautiful Mind. But [Elah] turned out to be quite a bit better than I expected...[It's] a melancholy rumination on the hidden casualties of (any) war and a somber inquiry into the heavy toll exacted on the wives, parents, and children of military men...And, biblical parallels aside, the film showcases the best work Tommy Lee Jones has done in years."

From the year-end list: "Paul Haggis' surprisingly unsentimentalized depiction of the hidden costs of war for the homefront, Elah benefits greatly from Tommy Lee Jones' slow burn as a military father who's lost his last son to a horrific murder...There was something quintessentially America-in-2007 about Jones this year. In every crease and furrow of this grizzled Texan's visage, we can see the wounds and weariness of recent times, the mask of dignity and good humor beginning to slip in the face of tragic events and colossal stupidity."

In the Valley of Elah wasn't the best TLJ movie of 2007 -- that'll come later -- but, surprisingly given Paul Haggis' involvement, it was a darned good one. Looking back, the key, I think, was that everyone here from Jones to Susan Sarandon, Charlize Theron, Jason Patric, and Josh Brolin in supporting roles underplayed the material, so that only a few in-your-face Haggisian elements rankle -- that bizarre and plot-convenient van technician, for example, or the perhaps too-on-the-nose final shot of the movie. Otherwise, though, Elah cut deeper for staying free of the bombast that marked Paul Haggis' overwrought Crash, and it boasted arguably the best performance of 2007.

70. Boiler Room (2000)

From the year-end list: "Surprisingly good, not the least because of the charismatic Vin Diesel, Glengarry Glen Affleck, and the great Wall Street scene."

Wall Street for the DVD generation, Ben Younger's Boiler Room was another nice surprise. Ok, some of the father-son stuff with Giovanni Ribisi and Ron Rifkin is pretty well overcooked. But, as with Ocean's 12, I like the meta-ness involved here. The fact that all these chop shop Jersey Boys constantly and lovingly quote Wall Street and Glengarry Glen Ross throughout made the movie seem that much more realistic. And Boiler Room resonates tellingly in the details, like newly-minted millionaire Ben Affleck owning nothing but a McMansion, a giant TV, and a tanning bed. It's basically a B-movie, sure, but it's a much better one than you'd ever expect going in.

69. Jackass (2002)

From the original review: "If you've seen the ads, you probably already know whether or not this film will appeal to you: You're either going to find it hilarious or repellent (or probably both). I was sickened and disgusted, and there were times I was laughing so hard that Berkeley thought there was something wrong with me...Alligator Tightrope may just be the dumbest, most nightmarish and cringe-funny thing I've seen all year."

If you've been reading this list carefully, you may have noticed that I telegraphed this potentially contentious pick back with Borat at #97 (as well as with my caveat about Z-grade comedies in the original intro.) And all I can say is, s/he with the straight face cast the first stone. I know Jackass is barely a movie at all - it's television on a movie screen, and depraved, zero-budget television at that. It has little-to-no redeeming social value, it spawned a lot of worthless and sub-moronic imitations, and, in fact, it's mostly just ninety minutes of charismatic lunatics doing patently stupid things. But, lord help me, it is really, really funny at times.

I never saw the 2006 follow-up, so that one might've been even more hilarious or the well might've run dry by then. Nonetheless, the original Jackass had the uncanny ability to bypass all higher-order thought processes and send my reptile brain into giggling fits. It's like a shiny toy car, plunged straight into the comedy id.

68. Secretary (2002)

From the year-end list: "A heart-warming romantic comedy about a boy, a girl, and the spankings that brought them together...A lot of the people I've spoken with had trouble with the ending, but I thought that it ended the only way it really could...any other way would've given the audience the out they wanted to condemn these people as sideshow freaks. By treating this bizarre couple as just another relationship in a weird wide world, Secretary offers a portrait of two people 'just right' for each other that is much more touching than the average, vanilla romantic comedy."

So, while I'm getting the sick-and-twisted choices out of the way, can I get a word in for Steven Shainberg's Secretary? Based on the Mary Gaitskill short story and the film that made Maggie Gyllenhaal a star, Secretary was in essence an attempt to test the boundaries of the rom-com format by seeing if it could accommodate a little BDSM kink. In fact, however naughty-minded at times, Secretary is actually pretty standard fare: Get past the cuffs and such, and what we here is a meet-cute between two people who are surprisingly perfect for each other, some not-insurmountable romantic turmoil along the way, and eventually a marriage and a happy ending -- It's like J. Lo's The Wedding Planner or Maid in Manhattan, if J. Lo was still wearing her S&M get-ups from The Cell. (Now that I think about it, Secretary may not even be all that outside-the-norm. Let's remember 1990's Pretty Woman, a movie oddly considered romantic by tons of aficionados of the genre, is basically the story of Richard Gere up and buying himself a hooker.)

True, James Spader had already played a bizarro-perv way too often to be taken seriously here. And, in fact, you can see him slowly, inexorably turning into the Brundlefly version of William Shatner he would eventually become as the movie grinds along. Still, as far as rom-coms go, I thought Secretary went down more easily than most. Say what you will about the bondage on display here -- I'd argue there are dozens of rom-coms out each year -- say How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days or The Ugly Truth, to name just two -- that are the real cruel and unusual punishment.

67. (500) Days of Summer (2009)

From the original review: "This won't be a film for everyone -- It's often too cute or clever by half, and I'll concede that it probably reeks of forced Little Miss Sunshine or Juno-style indie cachet to people who don't roll with it...For me this definitely goes on the Garden State 'vaguely-guilty pleasure' pile...It'd be hard to sum up (500) Days better or more succinctly than the tagline: 'Boy meets girl. Boy falls in love. Girl doesn't.' If this has ever happened to you, and lordy has it happened to me, I suspect you'll enjoy [it] quite a bit as well."

From the year-end list: "Speaking of sad British pop music, here's a movie the early Elvis Costello would love. Sure, (500) Days is unabashedly for folks who've been on the wrong end of a break-up. But, even if it is ultimately Annie Hall-lite in a lot of ways, it had more truths to tell than most of the rom-coms out in any given year...combined."

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, and Summer's lease hath all too short a date...500 days, in fact. But, hey, at least we'll always have the memories. Despite the way it was sold, (500) Days of Summer is barely a love story at all, nor is it a dissection of how a particular romance -- that of Tom (Joseph Gordon-Leavitt) and Summer (Zooey Deschanel) goes sour. It's more about how Tom is, despite himself, driven to romance in the first place (Hint: It's Morrissey's fault), and about how the desire to be in love can sometimes be mistakenly substituted for the real thing.

If that sounds a bit heavy, well, it's not -- (500) Days also includes a musical number, a Han Solo cameo, lots of goofy shenanigans involving Geoffrey Arend (a.k.a. Mr. Christina Hendricks) short, there's a lot of sugar to help soothe all the break-up angst here. I doubt (500) Days makes for a very good date movie in the end, but it's a good one to cue up if and when that date goes south. (And since all early word seems to indicate that Matthew Vaughn's Kick-Ass will make a star of Chloe Moretz in 2010, let's remember she did the preternaturally mature pre-teen schtick here first.)

66. Lord of War (2005)

From the original review: "At once a character study of an amoral arms dealer, a bitter tirade againt third world exploitation, and a dark comedy that may run too sour for some tastes, Lord of War is an above-average entrant in the satirical muckraking tradition. And its occasional preachiness is leavened by Nicolas Cage's consistently-amusing and deftly-written performance, most of which is voiceover, at the center of the film."

From the year-end list: "Anchored by Nicholas Cage's wry voiceover, Andrew Niccol's sardonic expose of the arms trade was the funniest of this year's global message films (That is, if you like 'em served up cold.)"

Lord of War is one of those movies that's moved up in my estimation over the years, partly because later attempts at political satire, such as Jason Reitman's Thank You for Smoking, couldn't ever seem to find the delicate balance of this mordant and spirited tirade against the arms industry. There are some excellent performances here from the likes of Ian Holm and Eamonn Walker, but in the end this is Nic Cage's show, and, as with this year's Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans, this film shows how good he can be when he's not just working for a paycheck. And like The Wire, Andrew Niccol's Lord of War is both very angry and very funny: Its sensitivity to obvious injustices in the world -- "Thank God there are still legal ways to exploit developing countries" -- fuels its dark brand of humor, and vice versa.

65. Bamboozled (2000)

Speaking of which, Spike Lee's overlooked and much-maligned Bamboozled works very similarly to Lord of War in its anger-to-humor quotient, and it is, possibly up until its last act, a very funny satire. (It also makes for a great double-feature with Kevin Wilmott's alternate history mockumentary CSA: The Confederate States of America, which Lee executive-produced.)

Most obviously, Bamboozled sheds a harsh light on aspects of America's pop-culture past that we still remain eerily silent about. But it's also a ruthless, equal-opportunity lampooner, calling out Michael Rappaport's white-boy sports fan ("I'm blacker than you, brother-man!") as mercilessly as Mos-Def's crew of would-be gangsta rappers, the Mau-Maus. (There's a devastating joke at the end of the movie involving the cops and "1/16th" (a.k.a. MC Serch of 3rd Bass), the "light-skinned" member of the Mau Maus: Everybody else gets shot, he -- despite his best attempts -- can only get arrested.)

Not even the main character, Damon Wayans' Pierre Delacroix, is safe from Lee's scouring here. A guy who for all intent and purposes lives his life in "whiteface," DeLa eventually gets his comeuppance from his dad, in a choice cameo by Paul Mooney. ("Boy, where the f**k did you get that accent?") More than just call out the old embarrassing traditions of blackface and minstrelsy, Bamboozled casts blame all around. It very plausibly suggests how blackface notions have remained alive in recent decades (Good Times, anyone?), while noting the artistry of the performers so often forced into such lowly affairs (in this case, Savion Glover, Tommy Davidson, and the Roots, who put on a good show despite the sordidness of it all.) Sure, Bamboozled gets a bit lost in the weeds in its final moments, but a lot of satires have a tendency to ride off the rails in the last act. Until then, Bamboozled will make you angry, it will make you laugh, and it will make you think.

64. Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003)

From the original review: "Like pretty much all of Weir's other films, Commander is an extremely competent piece of work, in some ways even masterful...[T]he historical details seemed right to my landlubber's eye, and I thought the languid, episodic pacing of the film...helped to convey the rhythm of life at sea in the Napoleonic era...kudos go out to Peter Weir & crew for making a picture as engrossing and transporting as this one."

From the year-end list: "It's a long title, it's a long movie. But a good kinda fact, as I said in my initial review, it seemed to move to the langorous rhythms of a long sea voyage, one that I may not take again for awhile, but one that I still thoroughly enjoyed. And I'll say this for Russell Crowe...somewhere along the way in each of his films, I tend to forget that he's Russell Crowe. His Capt. Jack Aubrey was no exception."

I haven't watched Master and Commander since it first set sail in 2003, and I have a feeling I should probably give it another go. The movie seems to have floated to the higher echelons of a lot of other Best-of-Decade lists and, If nothing else, Weir's film made for the other quality Star Trek reboot we saw this decade. In fact, particularly given how sequel-crazed Hollywood tends to be these days, I'm sorta surprised we never saw any of the other Patrick O'Brien seafaring novels made into movies after this film, even if they had to recast Crowe and go with someone other than Weir to direct. (I assume Paul Bettany would still be game -- the man did just make Legion, after all.) Who knows? Perhaps the studio suits got scared off by a Jonah somewhere along the line.

63. Mystic River (2003)

From the original review: "[W]ith its crisp, no-nonsense direction and a glut of extraordinary pretty much has to be considered an Oscar contender...To paraphrase the son of an altogether different neighborhood, sometimes the world is a monster, bad to swallow you whole."

From the year-end list: "The waters of the Charles are disturbed, something is rotten in the outskirts of Boston, and it's safe to say the Fates are wicked pissed...Mystic River is inhabited and propelled by a spirit of lumbering, impending, inexorable doom...what Legolas might call a 'sleepless malice.' It is that existential malice, rooted so strongly in local color, that gives this River its considerable power."

What with Scorsese's The Departed and Affleck's Gone Baby Gone, several crime sagas of the Oughts went to the Hub for their local color. (I guess the trend might've started with 1994's Blown Away, although I've tried to willfully forget that movie.) In any case, Clint Eastwood's Mystic River (like Gone, originally a novel by Dennis Lehane) was the best of the lot. There are some elements of the story that don't really work on film -- Kevin Bacon's silent phone-stalker of an ex-wife, for example, or Laura Linney's Lady Macbeth routine near the end of the film. Nonetheless, most of Mystic River is very worthwhile.

In retrospect, it would have been that much nicer to see Bill Murray win the Oscar that year for Lost in Translation, given that Sean Penn ended up winning again for Milk later on. But Penn, as with the rest of the cast, is very good here. (Consider the scene of him breaking down on his Dorchester porch, in front of Tim Robbins.) Hard times in Beantown, alright.

62. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005)

From the original review: "Mike Newell's dark and delectable Goblet is brimming over with energy and suspense, and, to my surprise, it's probably the best Potter film so far. (And this is coming from someone who actually preferred Book III to Book IV on paper.)"

From the year-end list: "[G]ive Mike Newell credit: Harry's foray into Voldemortish gloom and teenage angst was easily the most compelling Potter film so far. Extra points to Gryffindor for Brendan Gleeson's more-than-slightly-bent Mad-Eye Moody, and to Slytherin for Ralph Fiennes' serpentine cameo as He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named."

Beginning with 2001's Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, Young Mr. Potter had many filmed adventures over the course of this decade -- six in all. And, while I know Alfonse Cuaron's Prisoner of Azkhaban has its supporters, I thought this fourth installment by Mike Newell was the closest the movie series ever came to capturing the magic of the (first several) books.

We've moved pretty far afield here from the flat, colorful, and thoroughly boring Hogwarts of the Chris Columbus iterations -- In Goblet, Dumbledore's academy of magic possesses the menace and grandeur it was missing earlier on. Meanwhile, a lot of the original cast, most notably the kids, have found their groove by Act IV (as has Richard Harris' replacement, Michael Gambon), and they pick up some key reinforcements in Brendan Gleeson, Ralph Fiennes, Clemence Poesy, and even the Doctor himself, David Tennant. Throw in the ironic pre-Thatcher haircuts, an early sighting of Twilight's Robert Pattinson for the fangirls, and our first real interaction with He Who Must Not Be Named, and Goblet had a little something for everybody.

61. Iron Man (2008)

From the original review: "[G]iven I have no real reservoir of nostalgia for its titular hero, Jon Favreau's crisp, surprisingly fun Iron Man seems that much more of an achievement...As far as origin stories go, I'd say Iron Man can hold its helmet proudly alongside Batman Begins and the Donner Superman, thanks mainly to its superb cast (and inspired casting)...[I]f you allow for the constraints of the genre, Iron Man is basically everything you'd want in a summer-y superhero blockbuster."

From the year-end list: "Much better than I ever anticipated, Jon Favreau's (and Robert Downey Jr.'s) Iron Man kicked a summer of superheroes off in grand fashion. In the end, I preferred the gloomy stylings of Gotham in 2008, but there's definitely something to be said for this rousing, upbeat entrant in the comic movie canon. It delivered on its own terms, and it was a much better tech-fetishizing, boys-and-their-toys type-film than, say, 2007's Transformers or (I suspect) 2009's GI Joe."

"Heavy boots of lead fills his victims full of dread. Running as fast as they can, Iron Man lives again!" As, for that matter, does Robert Downey, Jr., who began his recent career reinvention as a box office A-lister (see also: Sherlock Holmes) with his turn here as alcoholic Marvel billionaire Tony Stark. Throw in a very enjoyable Jeff Bridges as the Big Bad and Jon Favreau keeping an admirably light touch in a summer of darkest knight, and you end up with a surprisingly fun comic book outing, one that largely sidestepped the "origin story" doldrums that mar a lot of films in the genre. Now, let's hope Mickey Rourke, Sam Rockwell, and Scarlett Johansson can take Iron Club up a notch in this summer's sequel.

60. Batman Begins (2005)

From the original review: "I'm happy to report that, while Chris Nolan's Batman Begins has some minor problems -- each character gets a few clunky lines and the final action sequence isn't all that memorable -- this is the Batman movie that fans of the Dark Knight have been waiting for. There's no Schumacher statuary in this Gotham City, and nary a Burtonesque Batdance to be had. Nope, this is just straight-up Frank Miller-style Batman, scaring the bejeezus out of the underworld in his inimitable fashion."

From the year-end list: "The Dark Knight has returned. Yes, the samurai-filled first act ran a bit long and the third-act train derailing needed more oomph. Still, WB and DC's reboot of the latter's second biggest franchise was the Caped Crusader movie we've all been waiting for. With help from an A-list supporting cast...Chris Nolan and Christian Bale brought both Batman and Bruce Wayne to life as never before, and a Killing Joke-ish Batman 2 is now on the top of my want-to-see list."

"Without warning, it comes, crashing through the window of your study...and mine...I have seen it before frightened me as a boy...frightened me...Yes, Father. I shall become a bat." Speaking of the Dark Knight, 2005's Batman Begins was another very solid "origin-story" comic book film, one that long-suffering fans of the Caped Crusader had waited for for a good long while. Yes, Begins has some problems -- there's probably too much "fear is the mindkiller"-type patter throughout, the elevated railcar climax is goofy, the villain's plan makes no sense (people, after all, are bags of mostly water -- they'd be blowing up right along with the sewer mains), and Batman's farewell to Ras Al Ghul ("I won't kill you, but I don't have to save you") is totally and utterly out of character. (I blame co-screenwriter David Goyer, who should've known better.)

All that being said, you finally got the sense here that Batman was in the hands of a director who just wanted to figure out what makes a ridiculously rich guy want to dress up like a bat and fight crime. (Tim Burton is a good director, and I'm particularly fond of Batman Returns. But while Returns is a great Tim Burton movie, it's not a particularly good Batman flick, some of the Catwoman romance notwithstanding.) And if Nolan could get this close to capturing the spirit of Frank Miller's Batman: Year One, it just made you wonder what he could do once he got his hands on The Killing Joke...

59. Good Night, and Good Luck (2005)

From the original review: "While perhaps a bit too black-and-white in terms of the history, George Clooney's Good Night, and Good Luck is nevertheless a somber and captivating paean to Edward R. Murrow, his televised expose of Joe McCarthy, and, by extension, the Pioneer Days of Television Journalism...[W]hat could have been an above-average History Channel documentary is instead a powerful and intelligent work of cinema that's easily one of the better films out this year."

From the year-end list: "A historical film that in other hands might have come off as dry, preachy edutainment, Good Night, and Good Luck instead seemed as fresh and relevant as the evening news...well, that is, if the news still functioned properly."

Enemy sighted, Enemy met -- I'm addressing the realpolitik: In a decade that saw television journalism continue to devolve into a morass of apple-cheeked automatons doling out substance-less blather, George Clooney's Good Night, and Good Luck was both a refreshing tonic and a wistful remembrance of the days that were. Yes, folks, there was apparently a time when the Fourth Estate didn't necessarily act like court stenographers for the people in power. Although, as the black and white cinematography would suggest, that time seems like a million miles from now.

58. District 9 (2009)

From the original review: "The head of the film, its first forty minutes or so, feels like a Paul Greengrass movie such as Bloody Sunday: a grim, gripping tale of social and political injustice...told in naturalistic, faux-documentary style. But the thorax of District 9 delves deeper into old-school David Cronenberg territory, with all the gooey orifices, transformational anxiety, and throbbing gristle that usually portends...And, by the time we get to the abdomen, we're suddenly watching a George Miller or Jim Cameron-style actioner, with more than enough visceral excitement to keep the antennae twitching. All stitched together, District 9 is quite a remarkable feat of summer sensation."

From the year-end list: "Neil Blomkamp's little (ok, $30 million) [film was the] South African indie that could. Alien Nation meets Cry Freedom with healthy dollops of Cronenberg body horror and old-school Peter Jackson viscera-splatter, District 9 came out as more than the sum of its parts, and...was one of the most purely enjoyable films of the summer."

Now that we've reached a stage where CGI can create pretty much anything, and for relatively cheap, it's good to know we'll still sometimes get unique and original sci-fi movies like District 9, in between the extended toy commercials and sequels based on board games. Neil Blomkamp's film is more than just Invictus with space bugs instead of rugby. It was a certifiably kick-ass sci-fi action film that never let its timely political parable get in the way of the entertainment at hand.

District 9 also works better than most thanks to Sharlto Copley's turn as one of the more memorably conflicted government bureaucrats in sci-fi since Sam Lowry of Information Retrieval. Let's hope Hollywood finds more to do with him than just Mad Dog Murdoch of The A-Team.

57. Wonder Boys (2000)

From the year-end list: "Perfectly captured the rhythms of campus life. The Dylan song didn't hurt either."

"I've been walking forty miles of bad road, if the bible is right, the world will explode. I've been trying to get as far away from myself as I can..." If nothing else, you could argue that Wonder Boys should be on this list just for helping Bob Dylan out of his two-decade rut, and delivering one of the best songs in his entire canon. But even "Things Have Changed" notwithstanding, Curtis Hanson's adaptation of Michael Chabon's novel has its merits. I haven't seen it since it first came out, but I remember thinking Wonder Boys got both the collegiate and the novelistic feel exactly right. At the same time, Hanson's movie felt like both wandering aimlessly around a campus (a diner, a kegger, a faculty party) and reading about someone doing as much. And I remember Michael Douglas and Frances McDormand both being particularly good here. I should probably see it again.

56. The Man Who Wasn't There (2001)

From the year-end list: "The Coen brothers stay in form with this beautifully shot film noir. "

With the definite exception of 2004's The Ladykillers (and, depending on your point of view, 2008's Burn after Reading), Joel and Ethan Coen had another banner decade in the Oughts -- we're just starting to sing their praises on this list.

Their 2001 outing, The Man Who Wasn't There was one of three attempts by the brothers these past ten years to explore the rules that govern their existential universe, and it's arguably their least successful of the bunch. Nonetheless, it looks absolutely stunning, and, like all Coen movies, there's a lot of great stuff in and around the margins of the film, from Richard Jenkins' alcoholic attorney to Tony Shalhoub's Perry Mason-ish Freddy Riedenschneider.

55. The Descent (2005)

Like District 9, Neil Marshall's satisfying B-grade horror flick The Descent has the good sense to grift from a lot of great movies. The mote-in-God's-eye opening through the mountains is basically lifted directly from The Shining, and there's more than a little Ripley and Vasquez to Shauna Macdonald and Natalie Jackson Mendoza's characters respectively.

Nonetheless, Marshall's film about an all-female spelunking trip gone horribly wrong eventually works on its own terms. Ok, the subterranean homesick rednecks are never particularly scary, and one of the endings works better than the other. But if you're in any way claustrophobic, some of the underground business in the caves will definitely set your teeth on edge.

I never saw 2002's Dog Soldiers or 2008's Doomsday, but have heard they're not as good. (There's also a straight-to-video sequel to this movie, which I presume is terrible.) Still, for most of its run, The Descent operates at about the level of a quality, old-school John Carpenter movie like Prince of Darkness, The Thing, or They Live! It's a hard groove to pull off decently, but with this film, Marshall nailed it.

54. Ballets Russes (2005)

From the original review: "It's a stunning film, one that I'd even recommend to people who have little-to-no interest in ballet. Like the best documentaries -- and this is the best I've seen in some time -- Ballets Russes transcends its immediate topic to capture larger and more ephemeral truths...Like a perfectly executed ensemble piece, Ballets Russes can take your breath away."

From the year-end list: "Penguins and comedians, to the wings -- The lively survivors of the Ballets Russes are now on center stage. Like the best in dance itself, this captivating, transporting documentary was at once of the moment and timeless."

Documentaries are almost assuredly under-appreciated on this list, mainly because I tend to miss a lot of the very well-reviewed ones, like No End in Sight and Taxi to the Dark Side. Dayna Goldfine and Dan Geller's Ballets Russes I did see, tho', and it's a definite keeper. As much about both the inexorable passage of time and the eternal joys of dance (note the Russian octogenarians reliving their old duets) as the story of how ballet became a widespread pastime in America, Ballets Russes feels like it manages to capture something elusive about the human condition during the course of its run. True, I have more of a connection to the ballet world than a lot of moviegoers, but I still think this film will strike a chord with almost anyone with an open mind and a tendency to tap their feet.

53. Battle Royale (2000) / Infernal Affairs (2002)

There can be only one. Those of you similarly disappointed with how Quentin Tarantino mishandled Go-Go-Yubari (a.k.a. a "homicidal Japanese schoolgirl with a tricked-up mace") in Kill Bill, Vol. I need only go back to the source: Battle Royale. If you've never heard of it, this 2000 film by Kinji Fukasaku involves dozens of schoolchildren forced into a death match by an evil government program and a ticked-off teacher, the villainous (and iconic) Takeshi "Beat" Kitano.

Ok, yes, the film may be in questionable taste here in the post-Columbine era, and it's spawned much concern about copycat behavior in Japan. (For those outraged by this film, I recommend Gus Van Sant's Elephant as a tonic.) Take it for what it is, tho', and Battle Royale is pretty solid entertainment, vaguely similar in a way to The Great Escape in wondering which characters are going to make it through the maelstrom. (The answer: Not many.)

Now, what does the Hong Kong "deep undercover" cops-and-robbers flick Infernal Affairs have to do with Battle Royale? Well, not much at all really, other than both being examples of quality Asian cinema (albeit from different nations.) But it occurred to me over the course of writing this second installment of the list that I'd forgotten about Infernal Affairs -- I originally thought it came out in the 90's -- and so I had to slot it in somewhere. (This isn't unprecedented. As you'll see, there are a couple of times in the final 50 where films share the same slot.)

In any event, Infernal Affairs in, in my opinion, a superior film to its much-vaunted 2006 American remake, The Departed. To put it crudely but effectively, Infernal Affairs is old-school Jack Nicholson. It's sharp and fast and lean and lethal. The Departed, on the other hand, was modern "Jack." It was bloated and hammy and self-mocking and probably should've been reined in a tad. IA also had the benefit of getting there first, of course. And, if nothing else, Infernal Affairs has one of the coolest men in the world in its favor in Tony Leung (in the eventual di Caprio role), which is no small thing.

52. Zodiac (2007)

From the original review: "[A] somber and engaging character study of the cops, journalists, and suspects caught up in the hunt for San Francisco's most famous murderer, and a moody meditation on how, as months yield to years without a definitive answer, the long, tiring search for truth comes to haunt and drain their lives away...The film is kind enough to give the audience something of a sense of closure at the end, but Zodiac is most intriguing when it leaves all doors open, and lets its characters get thrown about in the bruising wind that ensues."

From the year-end list: "The best film of the spring. What at first looked to be another stylish David Fincher serial killer flick is instead a moody and haunting police procedural about the search for a seemingly unknowable truth...Reveling in the daily investigatory minutiae that also comprise much of The Wire and Law and Order, and arguably boasting the best ensemble cast of the year, Zodiac is a troubling and open-ended inquiry...Whatever Dirty Harry may suggest to the contrary, the Zodiac remains elusive."

(For what it's worth, this film and the next one were flicks I traded back-and-forth for awhile, and both moved in and out of the top fifty.) A movie that makes for a good double-feature with one of the forgotten gems of 1999, Spike Lee's Summer of Sam, David Fincher's Zodiac works best when it foregoes the Se7en-like machinations of the actual San Francisco murders and concentrates on the Grail-like quest for certainty in an uncertain world.

Over the course of a draining decade of looking for "The Truth," Jake Gyllenhaal, Robert Downey Jr., Mark Ruffalo, and the other cops and journalists on the trail all go slightly mad. The archives become a maze, the police records a bewildering thicket of potential clues and possible leads. In the real world, Zodiac suggests, Dirty Harry doesn't solve the case, and Sam Waterston and Jerry Orbach don't get to the bottom of it all in 48 minutes + commercials. In the real world, you never just never know.

51. 28 Weeks Later (2007)

From the original review: "One of the things I admired most about this very dark film is its sheer remorselessness. From its opening moments and throughout, it instills a visceral fight-or-flight dread in the audience and refuses to let us off the hook, inviting us less to tsk-tsk about the hubris of American military overreaching and more to ponder what measures -- moral, immoral, amoral -- we might take to ensure our own survival in this nightmarish universe. Time and time again in 28 Weeks Later, compassion is absolutely the wrong answer to the problem at hand, and...people surprise you with the decisions they choose to make with their backs to the wall."

From the year-end list: "Sir, we appear to have lost control of the Green Zone...Shall I send in the air support? Zombie flicks have been a choice staple for political allegory since the early days of Romero, but one of the strengths of Juan Carlos Fresnadillo's merciless 28 Weeks Later -- perhaps the best horror sequel since James Cameron's Aliens -- is that it foregoes the 1:1 sermonizing about failed reconstructions and American hubris whenever it gets in the way of the nightmare scenario at hand...There's little time for moralizing in the dark, wretched heart of 28 Weeks Later: In fact, the right thing to do is often suicide, or worse. You pretty much have only one viable option: run like hell.""

A considerable improvement over the uneven first installment by Danny Boyle and Alexa Garland, Juan Carlos Fresnadillo's 28 Weeks Later is an absolutely ruthless film. Beginning with Robert Carlyle's Hobson's choice in the English countryside (Well, what would you do? Really? Are you sure?), Fresnadillo's film thrusts you into several ghastly and viscerally immediate situations where morality isn't much of a guide. Is General String (Idris Elba) right to order the immediate death of Alice the found survivor (Catherine McCormack)? Should Sniper Jeremy Renner be shooting civilians or not? Should doctor Rose Byrne really be helping these two children, also potential carriers of the virus?

There are no easy solutions in 28 Weeks Later -- That's part of what makes it so horrible (and the film so good). As with District 9, Fresnadillo doesn't let the political parable (here, the American reconstruction of Iraq) interfere with the story he wants to tell. And that story is very dark indeed.

50. The Proposition (2005)

"Australia. What fresh hell is this?" As I noted in my review of his 2009 follow-up, The Road, John Hillcoat's The Proposition was a movie I watched via Netflix late one night and felt like I had dreamed. There's something very strange and ethereal at work here in this Nick Cave-penned western about an outlaw (Guy Pearce) sent to kill his ne'er-do-well brother (Danny Huston) by an equally ne'er-do-well lawman (Ray Winstone). (Well, I think that's what it was about...I have a vague recollections of a filthy John Hurt talking his way in and out of trouble quite a bit too.)

Nonetheless, something about The Proposition makes it feel weirdly ancient and Biblical, like poetry and prophecy wrestling it out over an Outback campfire. I liked The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford quite a bit -- it's on my almost list. But I get the sense that, in its heart of hearts, The Proposition is the movie Dominik's sprawling epic really wanted to be.

49. The Bourne Trilogy (2002, 2004, 2007)

From the year-end list (I): "Another surprise...Matt Damon is believable, Chris Cooper and Brian Cox do excellent character work here, and Franka Potente and Clive Owen help lend the film an authentic European flavor that's gone completely AWOL over in the Bond series...If the first film's any indication, I'd rather see another Bourne than another Bond"

From the original review (II): "[T]hankfully The Bourne Supremacy is just as intelligent, fast-paced, gritty, and near-plausible as the first outing...The surprise here is how well everything's executed -- until the last fifteen minutes or so...the film moves at a kinetic, captivating clip."

From the year-end list (II): "[A] better Bond than anything we've seen in the past 20 years. Paul Greengrass' shakicam work here bodes well for Rorschach in The Watchmen."

From the original review (III): "If you see him, say hello, he might be in Tangier. Or Paris, Madrid, London, New York, Moscow...uh, sir, we have Jason Bourne popping up all over the grid here. Shall I put it on One?...[I]t's clear that Greengrass is firing on all cylinders right now. I was already impressed with him, but Bourne further suggests that Greengrass is among the very best directors working today -- Let's hope he shares with us more surveillance intel in very short order."

From the year-end list (III): "The third installment of the Bourne franchise was the best blockbuster of the year, and proved that director Paul Greengrass can churn out excellent, heart-pounding fare even when he's basically repeating himself. Really, given how much of Ultimatum plays exactly like its two predecessors on the page -- the car chase, the Company Men, the Eurotrash assassin, Julia Stiles, exotic locales and cellphone hijinx -- it's hard to fathom how good it turned out to be. But Bourne was riveting through and through...You just couldn't take your eyes off it."

True, Agent 007 received a much-needed 21st-century reboot in the Oughts with Casino Royale. But the decade belonged to Matt Damon's Jason Bourne, who yielded three exemplary cloak-and-dagger entertainments between 2002 and 2007. The Bourne Identity was the highlight of director Doug Liman's decade, wherein he established the international flavor and CIA-professional mien that would characterize the rest of this spy trilogy. And Paul Greengrass brought it home, first with The Bourne Supremacy and then The Bourne Ultimatum. I know Greengrass' brand of kinetic shaky-fu isn't for all action tastes, but I find it totally absorbing. And, hey, while Bourne III might've been a lot like Bourne II in the end, at least there were no invisible cars anywhere in the picture.

48. The Prestige (2006)

From the original review: "[W]hile I can't vouch for how well Nolan conceals his own prestiges from the audience here, I found the movie a dark, clever, and elegant contraption, one that suggests razor-sharp clockwork gears and threatening pulses of electrical current, all impressively encased in burnished Victorian-era mahogany. If you're a fan of Nolan's previous work, or of sinister mind-benders in general, The Prestige is a must-see film. Either way, it's among the top offerings of 2006 thus far."

From the year-end list: "[A] seamlessly made genre film about the rivalries and perils of turn-of-the-century prestidigitation...Throw in extended cameos by David Bowie and Andy Serkis -- both of which help to mitigate the Johansson factor -- and The Prestige was the purest cinematic treat this year for the fanboy nation. Christian Bale in particular does top-notch work here, and I'm very much looking forward to he and Nolan's run-in with Heath Ledger's Joker in The Dark Knight."

Having read the Christopher Priest novel beforehand, I was in on the trick with this movie going in. So I still don't know how Christian Bale's putty nose played to the uninitiated. (The nose plays?) Nonetheless, I found The Prestige one of the most satisfying genre entertainments of its year. And, while I haven't seen it since, I expect this Christopher Nolan conjuration should hold up quite well. (And a special bonus for Nolan's introducing us therein to one of my current movie crushes, Rebecca Hall.)

47. WALL-E (2008)

From the original review: "Andrew Stanton's ambitious, impressive WALL-E is definitely in keeping with the high standard we've come to expect from the Pixar gang...That the reach of WALL-E's ambition ultimately exceeds its grasp in the second hour, when the movie becomes a much more conventional family flick, can't be held too harshly against the film, I think...Still, after centuries of wandering around by himself, gazing at the stars, the Last Robot on Earth has fallen in love. Did we really need to contrive a second act to top that?"

From the year-end list: "If you saw one movie last year about a boy(bot) from the slums meeting -- and then improbably wooing -- the girl(bot) of his dreams, I really hope it was WALL-E. Hearkening back to quality seventies sci-fi like Silent Running, Andrew Stanton's robot love story and timely eco-parable is a definite winner, and certainly another jewel in the gem-studded Pixar crown. I just wish it'd stayed in the melancholy, bittersweet key of its first hour, rather than venturing off to the hijinx-filled, interstellar fat farm."

If WALL-E were just the opening forty-five minutes or so, it'd probably shoot up into the top 25, where it would rest next to another Pixar movie on this list. (Yes, in the immortal words of Yoda, There is another.") But WALL-E started to lose me once our lovelorn robot left the junkyard and headed into space, and all the Starship Titanic goofiness on the back-end just can't match the heart of the early going.

Still, in another decade of quality Pixar offerings, the first half of WALL-E was right up there among its finest productions. And, as I said in the year-end blurb above, this was the Slumdog Millionaire story of 2008 that i think will have the most staying power in the end.

46. The Royal Tenenbaums (2000)

While The Fantastic Mr. Fox will no doubt have its advocates in the years to come, the question up until this year has been whether 1998's Rushmore or 2000's The Royal Tenenbaums is Wes Anderson's finest hour. Well, I can take or leave Jason Schwartzman, but it's hard to bet against Bill Murray or Olivia Williams in a fight. Fortunately, for the purposes of this list, I don't have to choose between them.

In a way, Tenenbaums is Exhibit A for a lot of Anderson's usual extravagances, and they would definitely lose their lustre for me by the time The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou and The Darjeeling Limited rolled around. Still, Tenenbaums works. The various idiosyncracies of each wing of the family don't seem too belabored, not even the matching tracksuits. The hipster pop -- be it Nico, the Velvet Underground, or Elliott Smith -- seems pretty well-placed. And all the kitsch -- and lordy, there's a lot of it -- still doesn't quite overwhelm the story, as it would in later Wes Anderson offerings.

Plus, the basic point of Tenenbaums in the end is a sound one: All families are a bit weird when you get right down to it...ok, some more than others. But that doesn't make them any less family. It's an argument Paul Thomas Anderson tries to make in pretty much every one of his movies. This Anderson got it right here with The Royal Tenenbaums.

45. 24 Hour Party People (2002) / Control (2007)

Ok, fair enough, I'm cheating a bit with this double-feature. Aside from their subject matter -- both involve the death of Joy Division's Ian Curtis, the clinically-depressed, epileptic Tory-leaning poet of the post-punk generation -- these two films could hardly be any more different. Michael Winterbottom's 24 Hour Party People, which centers on Factory Records founder Tony Wilson, is mostly farce, one that would introduce a lot of us outside England to the mad genius of Steve Coogan. Anton Corbijn's Control, on the other hand, is a moody and naturalistic black and white piece following the rise and fall of a tortured artist that Corbijn knew personally, almost thirty years earlier.

Yet, for all their differences, both are superior and resonant films. And, taken together, they suggest how differently two movies can successfully approach the same tale. (Ok, 24 Hour Party People suggests Curtis was overwhelmed by Joy Division's popularity among British neo-Fascists, while Control pins Curtis' suicide more on girl trouble and general depressiveness - I tend to think Corbijn is closer to the mark.) Of course, out of the ashes of Joy Division came New Order, and while Bernard Sumner was never really the lyricist that Curtis was, that recombinated outfit has an admirable pedigree over the years as well. Endless talking, life rebuilding, don't walk away.

44. Coraline (2009)

From the original review: "Made with as much care and attention to detail as the best of Pixar...Selick's clever Coraline is a children's fable that moves with purpose, bristles with dark humor, and snaps together with satisfying, text-adventure logic. Like Dahl, Carroll, del Toro, and Rowling, Selick and Gaiman get that kids have more of an appetite for the unsettling and creepy than they're often given credit for, and that the best fairy tales are often dark, scary places. Coraline is no exception...And in terms of the sheer wealth of imagination and meticulous craftsmanship on display, it's hard to imagine that very many other films this year will be in Coraline's orbit"

From the year-end list: "In an auspicious year for both regular and stop-motion animation, Henry Selick's adaptation of Neil Gaiman's Coraline was the pick of the litter. It sorta got lost in the early-year shuffle, but Selick & Gaiman's dark, twisted fairy tale delivered the goods, and hopefully it'll find more life on DVD. "

As I said just above, Henry Selick and Neil Gaiman's dark stop-motion fable "gets" a simple truth about kids that much conventional children's fare misses. A lot of little tykes -- dare I say most? -- are more than a bit twisted. They thrive on weird and scary and grotesque. And Coraline produces -- It has the unsettling dream logic and elemental sense of scary that you find in Roald Dahl or the tales of the Brothers Grimm. And the stop-motion looks amazing -- It manages to fashion an eerie, home-spun look that was perfect for the story and that CGI-sheen can't (as yet) muster. Definitely worth a rental.

43. O Brother Where Art Thou? (2000)

From the year-end list: "To be honest, I wanted to like it more. Nevertheless, this amusing Coen paean to American folk and Faulknerian absurdity holds its own this year."
Like every other Coen movie, O Brother is a film that rewards repeat viewings. And this Southern gloss on The Odyssey, by way of Preston Sturges, has definitely grown on me over the years. As with so much of the brothers' output, things that tend to come off as bizarre non-sequiturs at first eventually seem like inspired lunacy once you vibe to it. ("Do not seek the treasure...") Here's hoping Burn After Reading ages similarly.

42. Shaun of the Dead (2004)

From the original review: "A friend of mine saw the trailer for Shaun of the Dead and noted it looked like a zombie movie written by The Kinks. That's actually a pretty good shorthand for this wry, witty film, although it eschews Ray Davies-like bitterness for a romantic comedy sweet that, for the most part, fits quite well. In fact, for the first hour or so, Shaun of the Dead is a total gas, particularly as Shaun and his couch-potato roommate Ed (Nick Frost) verrry slowly get wise to the shambling undead amidst them."

From the year-end list: "Although it lost its footing shambling to its conclusion, Shaun of the Dead was great fun for the first two-thirds of its run, and it's now probably my favorite zombie movie (everyone should have one.) A much-needed dry British humor fix to tide us over until Hitchhiker's Guide."

Zombieland may have aspired to the throne in 2009, but Edgar Wright's Shaun of the Dead remains the original and undisputed king of the "rom-zom-coms." Few movies this decade have been as endlessly rewatchable, and, if nothing else, Simon Pegg's Shaun has provided me with a great Halloween costume over the years. (It's worked much better than my stab at Donnie Darko, and makes for a great lithmus test to find the movie-people at any given Halloween party right away -- not to mention the women-who-find-men-who-look-vaguely-like-Simon-Pegg-fetching, which, as you might have guessed, is a key demographic for yours truly.)

The Pegg-Frost-Wright follow-up Hot Fuzz didn't make this list, alas, although it is a very entertaining village romp through cop-movie cliches. But here's hoping that Scott Pilgrim vs. the World and, whenever it gets off the ground, Ant-Man, will make next decade's top 100, come 2019.

41. The Pianist (2002)

From the original review: "The first half plays out as a well-done and unflinching (non-Spielbergized) look at life and death in the Warsaw ghetto. (Watching Adrien Brody step over the bodies of starved children on his way to work, I was briefly reminded again of how unbelievably unrealistic and offensive I found Roberto Benigni's Life is Beautiful.) The second half, however, is a different story. When through a combination of luck and timely aid Szpilman finally manages to escape the ghetto, the film enters (at least to me) novel territory and becomes a strangely riveting and unfamiliar survival story."

From the year-end list: "A 2002 film that I caught in March of this year, The Pianist is a harrowing and unique survivor's tale that's hard to watch and harder to forget (and I can't have been the only person who thought post-spider-hole Saddam bore a passing resemblance to Brody's third-act Szpilman.) Speaking of which, I said in my original review of Adrien Brody that 'I can't see the Academy rewarding this kind of understatement over a scenery-chewing performance like that of Daniel Day-Lewis in Gangs of New York.; Glad to see I was wrong."

Just as I don't ever cover Hollywood gossip here at GitM, I don't really want to get into the kerfuffle that has reignited over Roman Polanski this past year. On one hand, what Polanski did was disgusting, reprehensible, and certifiably criminal, and there's no getting around that. On the other hand, we just spent much of the past year basking in the afterglow of Michael Jackson's contributions to music, and the King of Pop, by most plausible accounts, indulged in similar predilections. Imho, what's good for the goose is good for the, uh, goose.

My point being, their personal lives aside, I still think Thriller is one of the best pop records of the past three decades, and The Pianist is one of the more powerful and engaging entrants in Holocaust cinema out and about. This is the story of the Holocaust outside the camps, and without that telltale Spielberg gloss. For most of the movie's run, patently craven behavior and sheer blind luck are as crucial life-or-death determinants as anything else. And even if Brody's pianist gets his own personal Oskar Schindler late in the film, the remorseless existentialism that drives Polanski's worldview here -- and most likely everywhere else, given the personal nature of this flick -- has already been well-established by then. Not for the faint of heart, The Pianist feels sadly and uncomfortably true.

40. Knocked Up (2008)

From the original review: "Well, as you've probably heard, Knocked Up is both very, very funny and surprisingly real. For one, it's got a funky, down-to-earth, DIY, lived-in feel that helps make it, along with Hot Fuzz, the most satisfying comedy of 2007 thus far. But Knocked Up also manages to be rather touching by the end, in a way that feels totally earned. The film doesn't rely on cutesy baby antics or wildly improbable romantic flourishes to garner your affection, but rather on showing flawed, realistic, well-meaning people trying to make the best out of the complicated situations that make up life, be they modern love, marriage, or an unplanned pregnancy. As such, Knocked Up turns out to be a knock-out, and a very welcome special delivery."

From the year-end list: "Judd Apatow's sweet, good-natured take on modern love and unwanted pregnancy was probably the most purely satisfying film of the summer. As funny in its pop-culture jawing as it was well-observed in its understanding of relationship politics, Knocked Up also felt -- unlike the well-meaning but overstylized Juno, the film it'll most likely be paired with from now herein -- refreshingly real. "

I almost put The Forty-Year-Old Virgin here, which is also very worthwhile in its way. But in a decade where American comedy seemed to be verging toward all-Apatow, all-the-time in its latter stages, Knocked Up was the former Freaks & Geeks auteur's most fully-realized creation of the decade. (FWIW, F&G came out in 1999.)

It is also, as David Denby pointed out in one of his better moments, the apotheosis of the slacker-striver romance that characterized countless rom-coms and quasi-rom-coms of late, from About a Boy to The Break-Up to, for that matter, the next movie on this list. And more than 40-Year-Old-Virgin and more too than Juno, the other unintended pregnancy fable of 2007, Knocked Up -- Seth Rogen's palatial digs therein notwithstanding -- felt like life in the Oughts as it really went down.

39. Sideways (2004)

From the original review: "In sum, Miles is almost completely beaten down by of course he attracts the attention of a smart, beautiful woman (Virginia Madsen) who shares all his important interests and remains fond of him, even and despite his awful behavior. If you can get past this one critical and wholly improbable plot point (and I did, eventually), Alexander Payne's Sideways is a trip to California wine country well worth taking. The movie basically plays like an approaching-middle-age version of About Schmidt (right down to the unfortunate nude scene), but this seemed a more well-rounded and generous film than its predecessor."

From the year-end list: "Like a fine 1961 Cheval Blanc, Alexander Payne's elegiac toast to California wine country and the regrets and indignities of middle-age has a tendency to linger in the senses. Paul Giamatti must tire of playing depressive, barely sociable losers, but he's great at it here...Sideways isn't as funny as Election, but it is a memorable trip."

To be honest, I still find it hard to forgive Sideways its central conceit. Speaking of slacker-striver romances, what on earth would Virginia Madsen ever see in Paul Giamatti's character? But that aside, Sideways was still one of the more memorable indy-dramedies of the decade, and, like wine and O Brother, it too has improved with age. (That being said, I still prefer Payne's Election, but that was also part of the season of riches that was 1999.)

38. Let the Right One In (2008)

From the original review: "A Swedish import that combines elements of the age-old vampire mythos with My Girl, My Bodyguard, and Morrissey (hence the title), Let the Right One In moves and feels like a particularly well-crafted Stephen King short story (or perhaps a bleaker version of one of Guillermo del Toro's Spanish Civil War fairy tales), and definitely makes for a compelling nightmare before Christmas if you're in the mood for it...[A]t times it feels as naturalistic, character-driven, and hyperliterary an endeavor as In the Bedroom or Little Children. There's definitely some gore here and there, but as with the best horror stories, Let the Right One In is most frightening in the realm of ideas, and for what it doesn't ultimately show or explain."

From the year-end list: "As if living in public housing in the dead of a Swedish winter wasn't depressing enough, now there's a nosferatu to contend with... My Bodyguard by way of Ingmar Bergman and Stephen King, this creepy and unsettling tale of a very unsparkly pre-teen vampyrer will leave bitemarks long after you step out into the light."

Y'all can keep your sparkling emo-Mormon vampires, thank you very much. (Although we would like Michael Sheen back when you're done with him.) This creepy and understated Swedish horror story of 2008 pretty much filled my own quota for teenage nosferatu love for the decade. Yep, it's a doozy, alright. And, not to get all Glenn Beck up in here, but you may leave as scared of life in Swedish socialist-style public-housing in the dead of winter as of the actual vampyrer at hand.

One word of caution: If you rent this film, watch it with subtitles -- I once saw ten minutes of Let the Right One In dubbed and the whole enterprise seemed tonally off. Speaking of which, I'm averse to the idea of the forthcoming American remake, Let Me In, particularly given that it's being brought to us by the director of Cloverfield. Still, I must concede, it has assembled a darned good cast: Chloe Moretz of (500) Days of Summer and Kick-Ass, Kodi Smit-McPhee of The Road, and Richard Jenkins as the handler, so to speak.

37. Intolerable Cruelty (2003)

From the original review: "I'm pleased to report that the Coens' first foray into full-fledged romantic comedy (although one could argue for The Hudsucker Proxy) is an out-and-out winner. I'd heard earlier that the Coens had diluted their trademark zaniness for the sake of a mainstream audience this time around, but I found the reverse to be true -- the brothers have instead juiced up what could have been a tired genre exercise (Imagine this film with Matthew McConaughey, Hugh Grant, Kate Hudson, or Sandra Bullock) with their unique flair and managed to create one of the best, funniest romantic comedies I've seen in some time."

From the year-end list: "I expect I'll be in the minority on this pick - This more-mainstream-than-usual Coen joint only got above-average reviews, and hardly anyone I've spoken to enjoyed it as much as I did. Still, I thought Intolerable Cruelty was a pop delight, 99.44% pure Coen confection...Light and breezy, yeah, but I thought it was that rare breed of romantic comedy that actually manages to be both romantic and hilarious...[I]t's good to know we can always rely on the Coens for consistently excellent work, and I for one am greatly looking forward to The Ladykillers."

Ok, so The Ladykillers didn't work out so hot. Still, Intolerable Cruelty is a much-maligned film, in my opinion. Featuring George Clooney at the top of his Coen game and Catherine Zeta-Jones as a natural foil for his throwback, matinee idol looks, Intolerable Cruelty was a rom-com that, I thought, zinged with some of that old-Hollywood, His Girl Friday-type pizazz.

Ok, Geoffrey Rush is over-the-top here, and so are a lot of the jokes, from the Tenzing Norgay, "Heinz, the Baron Krauss von Espy" business to Wheezy Joe's fatal inhaler problem. (For that matter, Cedric the Entertainer's part seems tailor-written for Jon Polito, and the Coens eventually re-used the really-old law partner joke in here for the Rabbi Marshak in A Serious Man.) Still, the cat-and-mouse romance at the center of Intolerable Cruelty works quite well, and it's a great deal of fun to watch play out. Try it, you'll like it.

36. X2: X-Men United (2003) / Spiderman 2 (2004)

From the original review (X2): "I'm not sure how it'll play to people who didn't grow up on the comic, but last night's midnight showing of X2 was much better than I had anticipated. Offhand, I can think of three setpieces (Nightcrawler at the White House, the assault on the mansion, and Magneto's escape) that were the closest thing to fanboy pr0n I've seen in ages (LOTR notwithstanding), and that's not counting all the great little flourishes and knowing winks throughout...Sure, the film drags a bit in the last twenty-five minutes or so (as they set up X3), but overall Singer & co. hit this one out of the park."

From the year-end list (X2): "Laugh if you want, but I can't think of any other movie where I had more fun this year. Arguably the most successful comic film since Superman 2, X2 improved over its rather staid predecessor in every way you can imagine...X2 was ripe with moments that seemed plucked directly out of the comics, if not straight out of the fanboy id. To me, my X-Men."

From the original review (S2): "Here he comes, watch out bud. He's got genetically engineered blood...and a frozen run of bad luck like you read about. After a series of underwhelming summer films so far, Spiderman 2 is a happy surprise, and a distinct improvement on the decent original. After an up-and-down first outing, both Sam Raimi and Tobey Maguire (as well as the gaggle of writers on board, among them Michael Chabon) have clearly settled into the rhythm of Peter Parker's struggle-filled existence, and the result is the most enjoyable and faithful comic book adaptation this side of X2."

From the year-end list (S2): "A definite improvement on the first adventure of your friendly neighborhood wallcraller, Spiderman 2 was a perfectly made summer film that stayed true to the spirit of Peter Parker. Along with X2, this is the gold standard for comic book-to-film adaptations right now."

Eh, you know, in the end, I just couldn't decide. With the onerous origin stories out of the way in each of their respective first films, Bryan Singer's X2 and Sam Raimi's Spiderman 2 were both a chance to let these beloved characters' freak flags fly. And, taken together, they were the highlight of Marvel movie-watching in the Oughts. Even more than Batman's much-heralded second outing this decade (still ahead of us on this list) there are scenes in both X2 and Spiderman 2 that feel like four-color panels come to life, from Spidey crawling on the ceiling while talking smack to Doc Ock to Magneto chuckling with glee while floating away from his until-recently-inescapable glass prison.

Both franchises hit a serious wall in their third outings, of course -- the poor, long-suffering mutants more so than our friendly neighborhood wallcrawler. Still, both X2 and Spidey 2, like Stephen Norrington's Blade, Jon Favreau's Iron Man, and hopefully Kenneth Branagh's upcoming Thor, proved that certain Marvel franchises can be very translatable to the screen when left alone in the right hands.

35. The Wrestler (2008)

From the original review: ""I'm an old broken-down piece of meat and i deserve to be all alone. I just don't want you to hate me." If that's your man, then tag him in: The final and best film of last Friday's four, Darren Aronofsky's The Wrestler is a downbeat, moving, and resonant character study of a man past his moment. If Frost/Nixon was the 'feisty underdog takes on the champ' Rocky movie of the day, The Wrestler captured the other half of that famous story -- the aging athlete shuffling around his 'real' life, looking for any place he can make sense of himself outside the ring...I wouldn't cry foul if The Wrestler manages to pin down Oscars for Rourke and/or Tomei, and it's too bad Aronofsky got locked out of Best Director contention this year -- dabbling in the 'rassling form has clearly been good for him."

From the year-end list: "Have you ever seen a one-trick pony in the fields so happy and free? Me neither, to be honest, but Aronofsky's naturalistic slice-of-life about the twilight days of Randy "the Ram" Ramzinski was likely the next best thing. I don't know if Mickey Rourke will experience a career resurrection after this performance or not. But he won this match fair and square, and nobody can take it from him."

Displaying an understatement and naturalism one wouldn't guess he possessed after Pi, Requiem for a Dream, and The Fountain, Darren Aronofsky hit one out of the park with The Wrestler, thanks in large part to Mickey Rourke's turn as, well, Mickey Rourke. With key support by Marisa Tomei (who had a much-better decade than 1992's My Cousin Vinny would ever have predicted), The Wrestler was an-almost perfect match between actor and role, and a small but very effective movie about the indignities accompanying an aging and forgotten warrior's latter days. Another round to the Ram.

34. The Hurt Locker (2009)

From the original review: "A taut, minimalist "men-in-combat" thriller that immediately goes up on the top shelf of Iraq flicks next to HBO's Generation Kill (and, if you're counting Gulf War I, Three Kings), The Hurt Locker is also that rare thing in the summer of Terminator: Salvation, Transformers, and GI Joe: a war movie for grown-ups...In vignette after vignette, The Hurt Locker ratchets up the suspense by degrees, until you find yourself -- like the EOD team we're following -- living out each moment in a heightened state of tension, endlessly waiting for the other shoe to drop. It's an impressive moviemaking feat, and it helps to make The Hurt Locker one of the best films of the year."

From the year-end list: "Bombs away, and we're not ok. Other than Modern Warfare 2 and Generation Kill, this immersive, nail-biting account of an IED team's travails in the midst of the suck was the best pop culture simulator out there for feeling embedded in Iraq...and stuck at the wrong Baghdad street corner at just the wrong time. And with the tension ratcheting to uncomfortable levels in each of the ordnance disposal scenes, Kathryn Bigelow's The Hurt Locker...was the action movie of the year."

Of course, warriors' glory days aren't all that much better, as evidenced by Kathryn Bigelow's tense and sparing The Hurt Locker. But, as with Randy the Ram, Jeremy Renner's Staff Sgt. William James has a taste -- some might say addiction -- for the ring.

Like the IED team it follows, Bigelow's movie succeeds mainly because of its attention to detail -- not only in ratcheting up the unbearable tension throughout, but in the little moments. Say, for example, the scene with Jeremy Renner in that suddenly ridiculous-looking American supermarket, or his interactions with the locals (both the kid selling DVDs, and the "safe" house he finds himself in later.) The Hurt Locker doesn't really offer three-part character arcs or easy-to-digest answers -- It just puts you right in the thick of danger, with all the fear and excitement that portends. War is a drug, indeed.

33. A Serious Man (2009)

From the original review: "He may seem cruel and indifferent. He may even be vain and jealous (Exodus 20:5.) Still, thank HaShem for the Coens! Like manna from Heaven, the brothers are the cinematic gift that keeps on giving. At this late date, you probably know if you vibe to the Coen's mordantly kooky aesthetic or not. And if you do, A Serious Man, their sardonic reimagining of the Book of Job set in late-sixties Jewish suburbia, is another great movie in a career full of them...A word of warning, tho' -- Despite the funny on hand here, and there is quite a bit of funny, in a way this world may be the Coens' darkest yet."

From the year-end list: "Oy vey. This existential disquisition into wandering dybbuks, sixties Judaica, quantum mechanics, and Old Testament justice was yet another triumph for those devilishly talented brothers from Minnesota. The Job-like travails of Larry Gopnik introduced us to several colorful, Coenesque personages (Sy Ableman, Rabbi Nachtner) and offered vignettes (the Goy's Teeth) and quotable philosophy ("Receive with simplicity everything that happens to you") that cinephiles will ponder for awhile to come. The Coens abide."

In another decade of solid-to-great offerings, A Serious Man was Joel and Ethan Coen's best comedy of the Oughts, particularly for those who like their Coen craziness straight from the tap. Going home to Minnesota for this inquiry into Judaism, mathematics, and the meaning of it all clearly brought out the best in the brothers, and the Coens ended the decade as they began, in lean, fighting trim. Whether it's Hail Caesar! or True Grit, keep 'em coming, guys. Each Coen movie is a mitzvah for the rest of us.

32. The Cooler (2003)

From the original review: "True, you can guess where this is basically going from the opening moments. The Cooler is ultimately a brief genre exercise in noir romance - It's not reinventing the wheel. But the wry script takes a few jags I wasn't expecting, and Kramer, Macy, and Bello succeed in fashioning two lovebirds who veer from playful to amorous to desperate for each other in a way that belies the cookie cutter courtship of so many other films...[I]f you can stomach the occasional burst of Old Vegas-style mob brutality (usually at the hands of Baldwin), The Cooler is a testament to the notion that even perennial losers can sometimes catch a lucky break, and a touching character-driven romance well worth checking out."

Word is the rest of the decade didn't go so hot for director Wayne Kramer, what with 2006's Running Scared and 2009's Crossing Over. (I didn't see either...did Crossing Over even come out?) But The Cooler, a magical-realist tale about the mystifying blessings of Lady Luck, was one of my favorite movie romances of the Oughts...and one that side-steps the Madsen-Giamatti Sideways problem with a key second-act twist. William H. Macy and the very underrated Maria Bello both bring their A-game to this Vegas fable, and Alec Baldwin does yeoman's work in the type of meaty character role he'd make his own as the decade unwound. Who knows? Maybe luck was just shining on Kramer that year.

31. Moon (2009)

From the original review: "Granted I tend to be a sucker for these sorts of films, which are far too rare nowadays...Nevertheless, I found Duncan Jones' low-key, hard-sci-fi rumination Moon to be really, really great -- exactly the sort of small-budget 'big think' science fiction production that it feels like you used to see a lot more of back in the day. (Silent Running, Outland, even stuff like Capricorn One and Soylent Green.)...Sure, I probably saw this film under ideal conditions for the subject matter -- by myself at the 11:45pm showing -- but I was riveted by it. And if you're a science fiction fan (or a fan of Sam Rockwell, who's showcased here to great effect), Moon is a must-see."

From the year-end list: "While Michael Bay, McG and their ilk tried to top each other with gimongous explosions this summer, Duncan Jones' moody, low-key Moon just aimed to blow our minds. A throwback to the seventies big-think sci-fi that has fallen out of favor in the post-Star Wars-era, Moon's big special effect, other than Sam Rockwell, of course, was its clever ideas. And in a year of hit-or-miss (mostly miss) blockbusters, Rockwell's quiet two-man show turned out to be the sci-fi extravaganza of 2009."

I feel like I've been chatting up this movie quite a bit lately. Still, in case y'all missed the thread, I really dug Duncan Jones' Moon. It's all of a piece -- A small, well-thought-out, and low-fi flick that just aims to tell an interesting science fiction tale and get you thinking, no more, no less. And amid the sturm und drang of Bayhem and McG's killer robots and Cameron's Pandora in 2009, I thought Moon's relative silence spoke volumes.

30. Requiem for a Dream (2000)

From the original review: "Technically, Requiem is a masterpiece. Darren Aronofsky pulls out every visual effect and cinematic sleight of hand he previewed in Pi, and then some, to great effect. There are some truly unforgettable moments in this movie, although I must admit that -- very occasionally -- the technical razzmatazz does get in the way...[D]espite...substantial problems, Requiem is a powerful, enthralling film that invites comparison with such downer classics as A Clockwork Orange and Taxi Driver. Two days later, I'm still mulling it over in my head. I'm not sure if I completely enjoyed it, but I do know I must recommend it."

From the year-end list: "Powerful, dazzling, and a technical masterpiece, despite the flawed ending. Gets stuck in your head like bits of food get stuck in your teeth."

Ah, Requiem for a Dream. In many ways, I tend to think this flick is wayyyy too over-the-top to be taken at all seriously. And by hyperaccentuating the extreme negatives of drugs here, what with the gangrenous limbs and heroin-fueled whoredom and whatnot in its final act, it sorta misses out on the reasons why people tend to take drugs in the first place. (Hint: They may in fact be enjoyable at times.) In that sense, at its worst moments, Requiem for a Dream can be as hyperbolic, monotone, and quite frankly ridiculous as a Nancy Reagan "Just Say No" ad.

But, for all of its occasional this-is-your-brain-on-drugs ludicrousness, Darren Aronofsky's Requiem is undeniably a powerful and hypnotic movie experience. Between Ellen Burstyn even outdoing Bale's American Psycho that year in a just-go-for-broke performance -- I still think she got cheated out of the Oscar -- and the droning, brain-slashing score by Clint Mansell and the Kronos Quartet (now a staple of movie trailers, thanks to The Two Towers), Requiem has moments that are still burned into my skull a decade later.

And with one clever film conceit, Aronofsky vividly captured one facet of addiction that rings all too true, whether your vice is cigarettes, heroin, TV, or Oreo cookies: Half of the draw -- well, maybe not half, but a sizable chunk, at least -- is the comfortable routine of a process. I guess that's why they call it a habit.

29. Sexy Beast (2000)

True, Ben Kingsley's surprising turn as a foul-mouthed Cockney madman is a bit of a gimmick. (In fact, Ralph Fiennes later used said-gimmick himself in 2008's In Bruges.) Still, Jonathan Glazer's Sexy Beast was a smart and funny crime thriller that introduced many of us to the venerable Ray Winstone (although Wikipedia now informs me he's been around since Quadrophenia) and that anticipated Ian McShane's later breakout/comeback as Al Swearingen of Deadwood. (Spoiler alert: It's also one of two movies here in the twenties that involve supernatural leporids.) And to my mind, some of the inspired England v. Spain riffing herein just never gets old.

28. Milk (2008)

From the original review: "Arguably the best film about the realities of politics since Charlie Wilson's War, Milk is blessed with excellent performances across the board -- most notably Sean Penn, James Franco, and Josh Brolin, but also supporting turns by Emile Hirsch, Alison Pill, and others. And as a chronicle of a key moment in an ongoing civil rights struggle, Milk also feels like a watershed film of its own in its approach to its gay and lesbian characters. In short, it's one of the best films of 2008."

From the year-end list: "What with a former community organizer turned 'hopemonger' being elected president -- while evangelicals, conservatives and sundry Mormons inflicted Proposition 8 on the people of California -- Gus Van Sant's vibrant recounting of the tragedy of Harvey Milk was obviously the timeliest political movie of 2008. But, in a year that saw entirely too much inert Oscar-bait on-screen in its final months, Milk -- romantic, passionate, and full of conviction -- was also one of the most alive. While it extends some measure of compassion even to its erstwhile villain (Josh Brolin), Milk is a civil-rights saga that harbors no illusions about the forces of intolerance still amongst us, and how far we all still have to go."

A film that put the lie to Brokeback Mountain's Kabuki-theater austerity to some extent, Gus Van Sant's Milk featured gay couples that were more passionate, more realistic, and, perhaps most importantly, more matter-of-fact than those decidedly not co-habiting in Ang Lee's Wyoming. Unlike the tragedy of Jake and Heath (or 1993's Philadelphia, for that matter), it showed mainstream (straight) audiences that being gay isn't, or at least shouldn't be, a matter of life and death. In fact, gay couples are a lot like straight couples -- varied, heterogeneous, often in lust, sometimes in love.

And its sexual politics aside, Milk was also a smart and insightful film about our American political system as a whole -- maybe especially in the year of Candidate Obama and Prop 8, but just as much so today. After all, the struggle for real change in America didn't end when Harvey Milk got elected. It was only just beginning.

27. Layer Cake (2005)

From the original review: "[A] smart, stylish, and sublimely smooth British crime film that does Guy Ritchie's Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch one better...Essentially, you know the drill -- this is a puzzle film in which you'll have to listen carefully and learn to distinguish between various delinquents with names like Tiptoes, Kinky, Slasher and Shanks. And, while the final few grifts just get a bit too big to be believable, for the most part the story holds together with intelligence and verve, in no small part to Daniel Craig, who's a magnetic presence here, and Matthew Vaughn, who displays a crisp, confident direction that's all the more impressive for being showy without ever seeming flashy."

From the year-end list: "If X3 turns into the fiasco the fanboy nation is expecting with Brett Ratner at the helm, this expertly-crafted crime noir by Matthew Vaughn will cut that much deeper. Layer Cake not only outdid Guy Ritchie's brit-gangster oeuvre in wit and elegance and offered great supporting turns by Michael Gambon, Kenneth Cranham, and Colm Meaney, it proved that Daniel Craig had the requisite charisma for Bond and then some (and that Sienna Miller is no slouch in the charisma department either.)"

In retrospect, Casino Royale should probably have been listed as one of the honorable mentions in the first quarter of this list. Nonetheless, Daniel Craig first proved he had the chops for 007 -- and then some -- with his star turn in this well-made and very entertaining Cockney crime drama. And he's only the pick of the litter here: Layer Cake also includes wily hands Michael Gambon, Colm Meaney, Jamie Foreman, Kenneth Cranham, and George Harris, as well as able performances by others soon-to-break-out like Ben Whishaw, Tom Hardy, and Sienna Miller. (Sure, one could argue Tom Hardy of Bronson "broke out" as the evil Picard clone in 2002's Star Trek: Nemesis. But did you see Star Trek: Nemesis? Being in that movie should be considered the opposite of breaking out, I should think.)

True, Matthew Vaughn's Stardust turned out to be amiable and mostly forgettable for me. But, if I'm holding high hopes for his Kick-Ass in 2010, it's because of Layer Cake, a movie that just got edged out of the top twenty-five. Along with...

26. Garden State (2004)

From the original review: "Seduced in by this teaser (and the accompanying song, Frou Frou's "Let Go", which has been flitting about my head for days now), I entered expecting a stylish but showy and self-indulgent film, as befitting a first-time triple threat. (At worst, I feared something along the lines of a Whit Stillman or P.T. Anderson flick.) But Garden State feels not only intelligent and confident but grounded, understated, and, like its dazed, over-medicated protagonist, even somewhat self-effacing. More than anything, I found the movie a sweet, quirky, and good-natured tone poem about awakening to both the pain and the possibilities of the life around you."

From the year-end list: "Writer-director Zach Braff's 'anti-Graduate' debut was a small but touching ode to home that, along with reviving Natalie Portman as an actress and offering the best soundtrack of the year, delivered exactly what it promised. A bit hokey at times, sure, but Garden State wore its heart on its sleeve and, for the most part, got away with it. It was a witty and eloquent voyage to the Jersey burbs and a testament to the proposition that as Paul Weller put it, it's never too late to make a brand new start."

As I've said many times, Zach Braff's Garden State is a bit of a guilty pleasure, but perhaps I should stop making excuses for it. It had the closest thing to a Pulp Fiction-like era-defining soundtrack that the Oughts saw, with cuts by Frou Frou, The Shins, Colin Hay, and Iron & Wine. It had a cast stocked with quality, A-list talent like Ian Holm, Peter Sarsgaard, and the inimitable thespian Method Man. (Where my cheese at?) It managed to bring Natalie Portman back to life after her near-fatal submersion in George Lucas' green-walled CGI prequel tank. And, like Moon, it was a small film that delivered about exactly what it promised.

In short, Garden State is pretty close to a modern version of the movie it so often references, The Graduate. (Or, at least, it's a heck of a lot closer to The Graduate than 2005's Rumor Has It, which more explicitly tried to make that claim.) What can I say? For me, at least, Garden State delivered.

25. Donnie Darko (2001)

From the original review: "All in all, this is a marvelously genre-bending film with wonderful anchoring performances by the Gyllenhaals. I think I liked this movie much more for not knowing a lot about it going in, so I won't mention the particulars here. But it's definitely worth seeing. Extra points for the soundtrack, which with 'Head over Heels,' 'Love will Tear Us Apart,' and 'Under the Milky Way'...reminded me more of my own high school experience than any other film I can remember. (The Dukakis era setting helped, since that was my own eighth grade year.)"

I almost took this movie out of the top 25 on account of its association with Southland Tales and The Box, and even the director's cut of this film, which snuffs out a lot of this movie's weird magic by slathering it in needless Midichlorian-style exposition. As I said in my recent review of The Box, Donnie Darko seems to be a clear and undeniable case where studio intervention saved a movie.

Nevertheless, part Philip K. Dick, part John Hughes, Darko was a touching coming-of-age story (thanks in good part to Mary McDonnell and Holmes Osborne as Donnie's cranky but loving parents), a decently funny satire about the vagaries of small-town life (think Sparkle Motion, "sleep-golfing," and the Love-Fear axis), and a trippy sci-fi/psychological thriller. (Was Donnie really talking to a demon-rabbit from the future, or was he just off his meds? The original version muddles this question a lot better than the Kelly cut.)

Whether or not Richard Kelly just got struck by lightning here, everyone else involved clearly brought their A-game to this production. Two Gyllenhaals got on the Hollywood board with this flick, although Maggie would have to wait for Secretary to really break out. The Michael Andrews score contributed mightily to the proceedings, as did the Gary Jules cover of "Mad World," which got a lot of run in the Oughts, from Gears of War to American Idol. And there are plenty of quality performances in the margins, from the late Patrick Swayze riffing on his image, to Beth Grant typecasting herself for the decade, to Katharine Ross coming back for one more curtain call. Fluke or not, the original version of Donnie Darko was one strange and memorable bunny, alright.

24. High Fidelity (2000)

From the year-end list: "An excellent adaptation of a great book, even if I preferred the Elvis Costello britrock emphasis of Hornby's tome to the indie Subpop scene of the movie."

"Charlie, you f**king b**ch! Let's work it out!" Arguably John Cusack's finest hour (although 1999's Being John Malkovich is right up there, and I know many might cite the Lloyd Dobler of old), Stephen Frears' adaptation of Nick Hornby's High Fidelity has continued to grow on me over the years. If it counts as one of David Denby's slacker-striver romances (see the discussion of Knocked Up at #40), it's definitely the one that hits closest to home for me.

The first thing people usually remember about this movie is all the Jack Black/Todd Louiso banter in the record store. ("It's a Cosssssby sweater!") And it's true -- All of that stuff is both really funny and all too telling about the elitism and obsessiveness inherent to the fanboy mentality -- "Don't tell anyone you don't own 'Blonde on Blonde'! It's gonna be okay." Besides, let's face it, this entire end-of-the-decade list is really just an extended High Fidelity-style Top 5 (and I had a great time back in July organizing my history books chronologically, a la Rob's record collection.)

Still, as with the book, High Fidelity's killer app is really the dispatches filed from Rob's romantic life, as he ponders what went wrong with his Top 5 Crushes gone awry. ("We were frightened of being left alone for the rest of our lives. Only people of a certain disposition are frightened of being alone for the rest of their lives at the age of 26, and we were of that disposition.") There's a lot of truthiness throughout High Fidelity, from Rob's catastrophic hang-up on Charlie (Catherine Zeta Jones) to his eff-the-world rebound with an equally besotted Sarah (Lili Taylor), to his single-minded infatuation about whether his ex, Laura (Iben Hjejle), has slept with the loathsome new boyfriend, Ian (fellow Tapehead Tim Robbins in a great cameo) yet.

In short, I'd argue High Fidelity gets the inner-male monologue closer to right than any flick this side of Annie Hall. In the immortal words of Homer J. Simpson, it's funny because it's true.

23. In the Mood for Love (2000) / 2046 (2004)

From the original review: "Since I spent Friday evening watching In the Mood for Love -- a tale of a romance-that-almost-was, told in furtive hallway glances -- and 2046 -- a broader and more diffuse disquisition on love and heartache -- back-to-back, here's an "

Some might consider this cheating to include Wong Kar-Wai's In the Mood for Love and 2046 in the same spot. But I watched them back-to-back in the same evening, and so they're inextricably tied together to me, even more than they would be anyway.

No word better describes these two films than sensual. The ruffle of silk, the click-clack of Mahjongg tiles, the strains of Nat King Cole, the ice cubes popping in the glass, the tendrils of smoke wafting through a shaft of light, the bead of sweat slowly gliding down the neck of Maggie Cheung. Wisps of melancholy, twinges of regret, and an irrepressible longing. Those are the grace notes Wong Kar-Wai uses to compose this evocative, moving duet about a love story that barely ever happened, and the lingering effect it has (throughout 2046) on Tony Leung. Unlike the almost-clinical restraint of, say, Ang Lee (see, for example, Lust, Caution) Wong Kar-Wai's films burst at the seams with emotion, and these two are no exception. Unforgettable, that's what they are.

22. The 25th Hour (2002)

From the original review: "[I]t perfectly captured the feeling of life in New York after the fall. Everyone's trying to go on with their business and pretend to move on, and yet everywhere you look there are grim reminders of that day's events, and somehow it's all you end up talking about. And the last fifteen minutes of the film, which tread a very fine line between hokey and surprisingly touching, are a haunting representation of what was lost that day (and, Lee seems to suggest, what could be lost if further attacks necessitate a New York diaspora.) In effect, this is Lee's ode to NYC's magic and resilience, and I think there were very few other filmmakers that could have pulled this off."

From the year-end list: "Another 2002 hold-over, and the best film yet made about the aftermath of 9/11, (which only seems natural, given that it's by one of New York's finest directors.) Haunted by might-have-beens, what-ifs, and what-nows, The 25th Hour feels real and immediate in its attempt to grapple with both 9/11 and the slamming cage in Monty Brogan's future. Only once, with the Fight Club-like fracas in the park, does the film flounder. Otherwise, it's a thought-provoking meditation throughout."

What I said back in 2003 holds true now: In a decade that became irrevocably warped by the events of 9/11, Spike Lee's The 25th Hour is still the best movie yet made about the emotional aftermath of that dark day. And just as Inside Man covered a lot of the same ground on race as the woefully overrated Crash, all the while managing to tell a zippy heist tale, The 25th Hour does almost all of this 9/11 heavy lifting as subtext to the story at hand.

For Edward Norton's Monty Brogan, who's facing down a prison sentence, as with everyone else, there is a hole in the center of the world. Things have changed, and the question now is what to do about it. Some grasp desperately for new meaning and connection in others, like Philip Seymour Hoffman's schlubby teacher, eyeing his student (Anna Paquin) in a nightclub. Some refuse to acknowledge the new reality at all, and just get louder and more obstinate about the way things are, like Barry Pepper's Wall Street trader. And some, like Monty, take the time to reflect on what's brought this lowly state of affairs.

The memorable scene where Monty rages at the bathroom mirror about New Yorkers and city life is classic Spike. It's funny, it knows its NYC, and it brings to mind all the mistrusts that led to tragedy one sweltering Brooklyn day in 1989's Do the Right Thing. But the coda of The 25th Hour, arguably the most lyrical sequence Lee has ever assembled, goes even deeper. It waxes on the underlying bond of New York, what it really means to be from NYC. "You're a New Yorker, that won't ever change. You got New York in your bones. Spend the rest of your life out west but you're still a New Yorker. You'll miss your friends, you'll miss your dog, but you're strong." And it explains exactly what was lost that Tuesday morning at Ground Zero, the Pentagon, and the fields of Pennsylvania -- the chance for 2752 men, women, and children to experience a long and happy life.

I'll let Brian Cox take it from here: "You have a son, maybe you name him James, it's a good strong name, and maybe one day years from now years after im dead and gone reunited with your dear ma, you gather your whole family around and tell them the truth, who you are, where you come from, you tell them the whole story. Then you ask them if they know how lucky there are to be there. It all came so close to never happening. This life came so close to never happening."

21. Mulholland Drive (2001)

From the year-end list: "Just when you thought it was safe to see a David Lynch film. After the surprisingly conventional Straight Story, Mulholland proves that David Lynch is still a master craftsman of the mindbender."

I still haven't seen Inland Empire, David Lynch's only other full-length film of the decade. (And at three hours, it's definitely "full-length." Offhand, according to a friend of mine, the IFC Center in the Village apparently had a "see-it-nine-times, get-the-tenth-time-free" special going on during its run.) Nonetheless, the eerie and unsettling Mulholland Drive is Lynch in top form, and a definite improvement on his last mindbender, 1997's so-so Lost Highway.

Lynch tends to repeat himself quite a bit, true. Dean Stockwell sung about the Sandman in Blue Velvet, and here we have Roy Orbison being crooned in Spanish. And, as always, there's a bizarre conspiracy afoot -- this time, involving a cowboy. Still, when Lynch is on, nobody is as good at making you feel like you're trapped in a nightmare, maybe even someone else's nightmare, and just can't wake up. (With that in mind, certain elements of 1992's Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me still make me shiver just thinking about them -- the moving picture on Laura's wall, for example, or the Ray Wise trapped-monkey thing. Garmenbozia...)

Obviously, there's a lot of that sort of stuff here too -- the whatever-it-is behind the diner, the blue box, the corpse with a hole for a face. Dune and The Straight Story notwithstanding, Lynch's movies tend to move to dream logic, and Mulholland Drive was no exception. This one is about the Hollywood dream. Like Naomi Watts' character, most folks move out there with reveries of being a star, ("I just came here from Deep River, Ontario, and now I'm in this dream place!") And, like Naomi Watt's character, a lot of them see that dream die hard. albeit perhaps not as hard as she does. (One small irony here: Thanks to Mulholland Drive, Naomi Watts is now an A-lister.)

Who knows how Mulholland Drive would've ended up if it had been optioned as the television show it was meant to be? But as a movie, it turned out to be pretty darned disconcerting, and one of the best films of the decade.

20. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007)

From the original review: "[A]n impressive and heartfelt depiction of how one man's personal Hell becomes, through love, will, memory, and imagination, at least a barely endurable purgatory...And, when the camera later forsakes the diving bell world of flesh and frailty for the butterfly realm of memory and imagination, we feel the same exhilarating sense of liberation Bauby describes in voiceover. By finally soaring out of the confines of Bauby's body and roaming the world with abandon, Diving Bell offers a visceral reminder of the power of film, and of imagination."

From the year-end list: "Through the wonders of cinematic alchemy, Julian Schnabel took the sad real-life account of Vogue editor Jean-Do Bauby's horrific imprisonment within his own body and made it soar. No other film this year put the "locked-in" experience of taking in a movie as inventively in service of its story...Special kudos to Mathieu Almaric for conveying so much with so little to work with, and to Max von Sydow for his haunting turn as Bauby's invalid father."

Aside from being a moving story about adversity overcome, Julian Schnabel's The Diving Bell and the Butterfly has one really great conceit that makes the whole film work wonders: A moviegoer is as locked-in to whatever's on the screen as poor Jean-Do Bauby was in his paralyzed form. This conceit -- making "the male gaze" literal -- forms the basis of much of the Diving Bell experience, and it's what really makes the movie tick.

The first twenty minutes or so of the movie are completely claustrophobic, mainly because you're locked-in there right next to Mathieu Almaric. And when Bauby finally begins to use his imagination to drift outside himself, and the camera at long last begins to move, the effect is as liberating and refreshing to us as a breath of cold mountain air. We viscerally feel the sense of reprieve that Jean-Do Bauby wrote about in his posthumous memoir, blink by pain-staking blink. It's no mean trick, and it gives The Diving Bell and the Butterfly a real emotional wallop that's hard to shake off and harder to forget.

19. The Incredibles (2004)

From the original review: "Well, the folks making next summer's Fantastic Four film must be having a really bad couple of weeks. 'Cause it's hard to see how they can even close to topping the energy and fun of Brad Bird's The Incredibles, Pixar's new gold standard (and here I thought Toy Story 2 was going to hold that honor for some time to come.) More a film for comic fans than for little kids, The Incredibles is an inventive, madcap romp through superhero tropes that gives Spiderman 2 a serious run for its money as the best comic book film of 2004."

From the year-end list: "Pixar has been delivering well-constructed eye-popping wonders since Toy Story, and The Incredibles is the best of the lot. I figured it might be awhile before a movie topped Spiderman 2 as a sheer comic book spectacle, but, as it turned out, The Incredibles did it only a few months later. One of the best comic book films ever made, The Incredibles was two hours of unmitigated fanboy fun."

To be honest, and as with Ratatouille (another Brad Bird-helmed Pixar production), I'm still a bit concerned about the political economy of The Incredibles. I'm all for an aristocracy of excellence, but it's hard to shake the contempt-for-the-rabble undertones and vaguely Ayn Randish sensibility that both Brad Bird movies possess, what with their "actually, some children (or rat chefs) are more special than others" through-lines. (And while I'm on the subject, I don't really cotton much to Craig T. Nelson's worldview either.)

But, now that I've gotten that out of the way, The Incredibles was as fun and imaginative a comic-book movie as we saw in the Oughts. True, like the television show Heroes, The Incredibles borrowed substantially from Alan Moore's Watchmen before Zack Snyder ever got around to it. But, as I said back in 2004: More than anything else, The Incredibles -- apologies to Tim Story, both times -- was probably the closest thing we'll ever get to a really good Fantastic Four movie, right down to the Mole Man-like Underminer that closed the film.

18. Memento (2000)

From the year-end list: "In a spring and summer characterized by truly awful blockbusters, this small film proved that a great story is still the best eye-catcher around. A gimmick, perhaps, but flawlessly executed."

"Now...where was I?" With Guy Pearce reprising Tom Hanks' earlier role as Mr. Short-Term Memory, Christopher Nolan kicked off a strong decade with Memento his sleek, well-scripted psychological thriller about an amnesiac in pursuit of justice (re: vengeance) for his murdered wife. As with Diving Bell and the Butterfly, this movie relies heavily on one neat trick that most everyone knows by now -- the story is told backwards. But, even that gimmick notwithstanding, Memento still holds up. (In fact, I watched it again this summer, and was surprised by how engaging it remained.)

To put on the political cap for a second, you could argue the questions Memento poses resonated throughout the Oughts. Like other folks we might mention, Guy Pearce's character here bends the facts of a horrible crime to slake a thirst for revenge. He pins the blame on crooks who had nothing to do with his original motivation. He wallows in an aggrieved, even mostly-contrived sense of injustice to propel himself forward to darker deeds. And he just keeps forgetting what really happened, because, as George Costanza once instructed us, "It's not a lie if you believe it." Sound like anyone from the past decade? Hmmm...I'll have to think on it.

17. In the Loop (2009)

From the original review: "[T]his is a gut-bustingly funny film. I honestly can't remember the last time I laughed so hard in a theater. (Alas, it was probably 21 Grams, and that was for all the wrong reasons.) True, given that this is a sharp-edged, basically anti-Dubya political satire that goes out of its way to reward pop-culture geekery (Frodo, Ron Weasley, and the White Stripes are all used as epithets at one point or another), I'm probably as close to a target audience for this sort of movie that's out there. Nevertheless, if your sense of humor runs anywhere from squirmathons like The Office UK or Curb Your Enthusiasm to sardonic political comedies like The Candidate or Bob Roberts to the current-events commentaries of Stewart and Colbert, this movie is a must-see. (And if you don't find hyperarticulate Scotsman Peter Capaldi spewing forth rococo profanities funny just yet, you probably will after watching In the Loop.)"

From the year-end list: "I'm not normally a huge laugher at movies, but this flick had me rolling. Basically, In the Loop is Office Space for people in politics, and it's a smart, wickedly funny entertainment. And like Judge's film and The Big Lebowski, I expect it will enjoy a long, happy, and very quotable renaissance on DVD. If you find The Daily Show or Colbert Report at all enjoyable, this is a must-see. And, even if you don't, well the choice Scottish swearing should get you through."

How best to explain In the Loop? Perhaps a show of the wares. Ladies and Gents, I give you 10 Downing Street's honorable, inimitable Malcolm Tucker (Peter Capaldi), and his strongly-worded request to Britain's UN Ambassador that he reschedule a crucial Security Council vote: "Just f**king do it! Otherwise you'll find yourself in some medieval war zone in the Caucasus with your arse in the air, trying to persuade a group of men in balaclavas that sustained sexual violence is not the f**king way forward!"

Or, Exhibit B: Here's Mr. Tucker on the relative youth of his political counterparts in the White House: "His briefing notes were written in alphabetti spaghetti! When I left, I nearly tripped up over his f**king umbilical cord...Yeah, apparently, your f**king master race of highly-gifted toddlers can't quite get the job done between breast feeds and playing with their Power Rangers. So, an actual grown-up has been asked to f**king bail you out!"

Now imagine two hours of these sorts of unspeakably filthy, top-shelf dressings-down, rat-a-tatting back and forth so quickly that you can barely keep on top of them all. That's In the Loop, a hilarious tirade about the Dubya-Blair shenanigans in Iraq that I expect will definitely pass the test of time. After all, the topic is timely, but funny is timeless.

16. Traffic (2000)

From the year-end list: "An expertly-made, nuanced glimpse at the drug trade that was good enough to convince policymakers in Washington...of the inefficacies of fighting supply at the expense of demand. Gets better with repeated viewings."

This is a movie that bounced back and forth with the very similar #14 before losing out to that fine production in the end, for reasons I will explain below. Nonetheless, Steven Soderbergh's moody and cerebral dissection of the drug trade is a keeper. From Benicio del Toro's compromised Mexican cop -- a guy who just wants to do one thing right by his neighborhood -- to Michael Douglas' embattled and eventually embittered top drug warrior, Traffic is blessed with involving, multi-dimensional performances across the board. In fact, Soderbergh even figured out how to get the likes of John McCain and Orrin Hatch to support common-sense drug reforms: appeal to their vanity and put them in the movie.

Just as an aside, the Michael Douglas role in Traffic is one of many great parts that Harrison Ford, arguably the biggest box office draw of the 80's and 90's, turned down in the Oughts, along with a part in #14 below and several others. Instead, from the man who was Han Solo, Indiana Jones, Jack Ryan, etc., we got Crossing Over and Extraordinary Measures (and, of course, Crystal Skull). The upshot being, Ford needs a new agent, stat.

15. Lost in Translation (2003)

From the original review: "[A]n unflinching look at the agony and torment of the human soul that is lying around your five-star Tokyo hotel with nothing to do...The film is funny, touching, sweet, often entrancing, and Bill Murray is really wonderful in the lead. It captures the disembodied detachment of travel insomnia and the exquisite anticipation of a newly-made connection in ways that belie the standard Hollywood older-man-meets-younger-woman narrative (Re: mogul wish fulfillment.) I do have nagging problems with Lost in Translation....But, not to lose the forest for the trees, I did quite like Lost in Translation. The film is honest and poignant in its depiction of two ships passing in the night, and Bill Murray - almost always good these days - is outstanding."

From the year-end list: "It was fun for a while, there was no way of knowing. Like a dream in the night, who can say where we're going? I still think Sofia Coppola cut a little close to the bone here in terms of autobiography...Still, I find this tale of chance encounters and foreign vistas has a strange kind of magic to it, and it has stayed with me longer than any other film this year. Bill Murray comes into full bloom in a part he's been circling around his entire career...Lost in Translation has its problems, sure, but at it's best it's haunting, ethereal, and touching like no other film in 2003."

More than this, you know there's nothing...well, ok, except 14 other movies. Anyway, the problems I mentioned above still linger -- the obvious score-settling aspects of Translation (Giovanni Ribisi and Anna Faris as Spike Jonze and Cameron Diaz respectively) are hard to watch, and Scarlett Johansson's character should really just, you know, get out more -- Being stuck in some po-dunk, one-horse town is one thing, being stuck in a five-star hotel in Tokyo is another thing entirely.

But, all that being said, Sofia Coppola's Lost in Translation is still a very, very good film. It perfectly distills that weird amalgam of jetlag, culture clash, opportunity, and wonder that accompanies foreign travel. (As Tyler Durden put it in 1999, "If you wake up at a different time, in a different place, could you wake up as a different person?") And it manages to realistically depict a nuanced, complex relationship that lies somewhere between friendship and romance, one that begins with a chance meeting and ends with a whisper. While Bill Murray tends to be the best thing about a lot of movies, neither he nor Scarlett Johansson -- nor, for that matter, Coppola -- have reached these heights before or since.

14. Syriana (2005)

From the original review: "While perhaps a bit too dry and convoluted for some tastes, Stephen Gaghan's Syriana is, IMHO, a top-notch political thriller that's easily one of the best films of the year. Admittedly...the movie definitely can be tough to follow. But, in a way, that's part of its charm -- Like the film's protagonists, we only occasionally glimpse the shadowy tendrils of the beast that is Big Oil, and come to share their despair that it can ever be subdued. In sum...Syriana is both an intelligent, compelling work of cinema and a enthralling piece of social commentary, one that not only feels pertinent but necessary."

From the year-end list: "I know Stephen Gaghan's grim meditation on the global reach and ruthlessness of the Oil Trade rubbed some people the wrong way, but I found it a gripping piece of 21st century muckraking, in the venerable tradition of Ida Tarbell and Upton Sinclair. True, Christopher Plummer was a mite too sinister, but otherwise Syriana offered some of the most intriguing character arcs of the year, from morose CIA Field Agent George Clooney's ambivalent awakening to corporate lawyer Jeffrey Wright's courtship with compromise. In a year of well-made political films, among them Good Night, and Good Luck, Munich, Lord of War, and The Constant Gardener, Syriana was the pick of the litter."

What Steven Soderbergh's Traffic is to drugs, Stephen Gaghan's Syriana is to the black gold, Texas tea. In fact, from tone to general approach to their subject, the films almost seem of a piece. (This probably shouldn't be surprising. After all, Stephen Gaghan wrote the screenplay for Traffic, adapting it from the BBC mini-series.)

As I said, these two movies went back and forth. But I ended up putting Syriana above Traffic because -- even with Christopher Plummer's evil lynchpin figure involved -- the latter film seemed messier and more ragged to me. Traffic ends with Don Cheadle getting an illicit wire up on Catherine Zeta-Jones' inherited drug business, Benicio Del Toro winning a key victory, and Michael Douglas deciding to speak from the heart at a press conference, in the manner of movies since Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. But Syriana ends with Jeffrey Wright basically just switching teams, while Matt Damon and George Clooney survey the wreckage of a political assassination they could not prevent.

Neither movie is what you call a feel-good film, and both are cogent works of muck-raking done extremely well. But, even more than Traffic, Stephen Gaghan's Syriana offers no feel-good escape or easy answer to one of the definitive political problems of our age. It just leaves us writhing on the hook.

13. Children of Men (2006)

From the original review: "Boasting a standout performance by Clive Owen..., great character work by Michael Caine, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and others; timely ruminations on issues ranging from the War on Terror to immigration reform; a wicked streak of black humor...; cinematography by Emmanuel Lubezki...that's both striking and muted; and some of the most visceral urban-warfare scenes this side of Saving Private Ryan, the film has a lot in its corner, and is definitely worth checking out this holiday season."

From the year-end list: "[O]ne of the most resonant 'near-future' dystopias to come down the pike in a very long while, perhaps since...Brazil. Crammed with excellent performances by Clive Owen, Michael Caine, Chiwetel Ejiofor and others, Children is perhaps a loosely-connected grab bag of contemporary anxieties and afflictions (terrorism, detainment camps, pharmaceutical ads, celebrity culture). But it's assuredly an effective one, with some of the most memorable and naturalistic combat footage seen in several years to boot."

From Brazil to Blade Runner, I'm always a sucker for a good, well-thought-out science fiction dystopia. And that's what we got here with Alfonso Cuaron's Children of Men, a smart and viscerally engaging sci-fi flick that riffed on everything from TMZ-style voyeurism (re: Baby Diego) to Big Pharma to anti-immigrant hysteria to, of course, the War on Terror. I still find the ending of the film a bit goofy, what with the highly-symbolic boat named Tomorrow and all that. But those long, drawn-out action takes more than make up for some occasional ham-handedness. And Clive Owen, Michael Caine, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Julianne Moore, among others? That's a Murderers' Row.

12. Letters from Iwo Jima (2006)

From the original review: "Eastwood's first crack at Iwo Jima in 2006, Flags of our Fathers, was to my mind a well-meaning dog...[But] Letters is really something quite remarkable. A mournful, occasionally shocking testament to the inhumanity and absurdities attending war, and a elegiac dirge for those caught in its grip, even on the other side of the conflict, Letters from Iwo Jima is an impressive -- even at times breathtaking -- siege movie. And strangely enough, elements that seemed trite or intrusive in Flags -- the desaturated landscape, the minimalist piano score -- are truly haunting and evocative here."

From the year-end list: "To some extent the Unforgiven of war movies, Iwo Jima is a bleakly rendered siege film that trafficks in few of the usual tropes of the genre...Instead of glorious Alamo-style platitudes, we're left only with the sight of young men -- all avowed enemies of America, no less -- swallowed up and crushed in the maelstrom of modern combat. From Ken Watanabe's commanding performance as a captain going down with the ship to Eastwood's melancholy score, Letters works to reveal one fundamental, haunting truth: Tyrants may be toppled, nations may be liberated, and Pvt. Ryans may be saved, but even 'good wars' are ultimately Hell on earth for those expected to do the fighting."

What with Space Cowboys, Blood Work, Mystic River, Flags of our Fathers, Changeling, Gran Torino, and Invictus (which I caught the other day -- review to follow in 2010), Clint Eastwood had a very prolific Oughts, and no mistake. And yet, while his worst movie of this bunch, 2004's Million Dollar Baby, turned out to be considerably overpraised (even inexplicably winning Best Picture that year), his best outing of the decade -- Letters from Iwo Jima -- got mostly overlooked.

If Unforgiven was the deconstruction of Clint's earlier, vengeance-driven westerns, and Gran Torino the disassembling of his vigilante, Dirty Harry ethos, this film was his pointed riposte to the war movies of his past. By flipping the script and putting us all in the other guy's shoes for once -- in this case, with the doomed Japanese defenders in the caves of Iwo Jima -- Eastwood made it clear that war is ultimately youths killing youths, whatever the principles at stake, and there is no glory in it. In fact, it is a callous, bloody, unforgiving, and loathsome business, and don't let any movie tell you different.

11. The Lives of Others (2006)

From the original review: "I know very little about this subject, so I can't vouch for how well van Donnersmarck recreates the rigors of East German life in the 1980s. Still, as an Orwellian parable of secrets and surveillance, The Lives of Others is a very worthwhile film, one strong enough to overcome some perhaps overly cliched moments of awakening by various characters along the way."

From the year-end list: "[A] timely and compelling parable of art, politics, surveillance, and moral awakening in the final days of the Stasi. In a way, Lives is an East German counterpart to Charlie Wilson's War, a story about how even small political acts of individual conscience can change the world, even (or perhaps especially) in a decaying Orwellian state. With a memorable central performance by Ulrich Mühe and a languid conclusion that ends on exactly the right note, the resoundingly humanist Lives of Others is a Sonata for a Good Man in Bad Times. We could use more of its ilk."

One could argue, I suppose, that The Lives of Others is really just 1984 with a happy ending, as if O'Brien just had an epiphany over Beethoven one day and decided to go out of his way to save Winston and Julia (or Winston, at least) from the Ministry. And that would be a fair criticism -- the motivations of Ulrich Mühe's chief inspector do seem a bit underwritten as presented here. He listens to some good music, reads a play, sees a kid, and Blammo! We got ourselves a man on the inside!

Still, The Lives of Others worked for me, particularly if you consider that it takes place near the fall of the East German regime. With its long, Return of the King-like conclusion, this is arguably the story of not only life under the Stasi, but how Germany ultimately moved past it to reunification. And, all that aside, I thought Lives was a stirring example -- or fable, perhaps -- of how art, humanity, and conscience can successfully conspire against power, surveillance, and corruption. After all, bureaucracies are only as all-powerful and hegemonic as the humans that staff them, and, to paraphrase Leonard Cohen, those cracks are where the light gets in.

10. The Dark Knight (2008)

From the original review: "Holy Catastrophic Wreck of a City, Batman! After two viewings, I'm happy to report Christopher Nolan's moody, sinister The Dark Knight was well worth the wait, and bears the high expectations set for it quite impressively. In fact, at two and a half hours (which zip along, and even feel somewhat truncated at times -- see below), this sprawling Gotham crime saga is almost too much movie to take in the first time around...Most importantly, if Begins, as I said in 2005, was 'the Batman movie that fans of the Dark Knight have been waiting for,' this is undoubtedly the Joker movie we've all been hoping for as its companion...Heath Ledger here is a true force of nature, embodying to a tee the malevolent, frighteningly insane jester of The Killing Joke and The Dark Knight Returns."

From the year-end list: "Yes, it's the obvious fanboy pick. And, admittedly, TDK had pacing problems -- it was herky-jerky at times and the third act felt rushed. Still, in a not-particularly-good year for cinema, Christopher Nolan's operatic reimagining of the Caped Crusader and his arch-nemesis was far and away the most enjoyable experience i had at the movies in 2008. And if Candidate Obama was America's own white knight (metaphorically speaking) this past year, Heath Ledger's Joker was its mischievous, amoral, and misanthropic id. If and when the economic wheels continue to come off in 2009, will stoic selflessness or gleeful anarchy be the order of the day? The battle for Gotham continues, and everybody's nervously eyeing those detonators. Let's hope the clown doesn't get the last laugh."

And let's be honest: The Joker's had a good year in 2009 (and, at least so far, our "white knight" of 2008 has been looking a little more Two-Faced than some of us anticipated back then.) In a decade that saw more comic book movies than even comic book fans might have asked for, Christopher Nolan's grim and relentlessly-paced crime noir was the pick of the litter. Yeah, some problems here persist -- The movie is a little overstuffed in its third act, and Bale's bat-rasp doesn't get any less goofy. Still, even more than Batman Begins, this was a full-immersion Gotham experience.

As per Nolan's usual m.o., The Dark Knight didn't shy away from grappling with larger themes amid all its impressive action setpieces. For example, there's much ado here about the compelling need to maintain convenient myths -- be it that Harvey Dent is a saint, or that Rachel will come back to Bruce, or that, as the Joker puts it, when bad things do happen, "it's all part of the plan."

Or, to take another example, TDK dwells more substantially than most any other comic films out there on the heavy price of vigilantism. Consider the bad behavior "the Batman" engenders among gun-toting do-gooders in hockey pads. And once Gordon, Dent, and Bats bend one rule -- extradition -- to get the mob's moneyman back from Hong Kong, it's Katy bar the door, basically. Next thing you know, Bats is "burning down the jungle" to get his man, including setting up a warrantless wiretap operation over in the basement at Wayne Enterprises. After all, once you've decided to go outside the law -- say, to fight crime in a big bat suit -- where does it all stop?

Of course, in the end the most memorable aspect of TDK was Heath Ledger's twisted, anarchic, and thoroughly menacing take on the Clown Prince of Crime. Mark Hamill's cartoon work notwithstanding, this was the Killing Joke-type Joker I had wanted to see on-screen since before the original Burton Batman. Particularly as compared to Jack Nicholson's indulgent performance back in the day, Ledger brought us a better class of criminal -- I just wish he could've stuck around for more.

9. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000)

From the year-end list: "Amazing film. Nothing bad to say about it. Go now."

I haven't seen Ang Lee's Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon in many years, so I can't really vouch for how well its blend of wire-fu enhanced wuxia and ancient Middle Kingdom lore holds up in 2009. (I do know it's better than Hero, House of Flying Daggers, Fearless, and Curse of the Golden Flower, to take several later examples of the genre.) Still, even coming as it did after The Matrix, also choreographed by Yuen Wo Ping, Crouching Tiger was an absolute jaw-dropper. And unlike Quentin Tarantino in the uneven Kill Bills, Lee wisely let Yuen's choreography provide the kinetic energy here, rather than opting for frenetic and choppy editing.

Speaking of QT, I'm sure he and countless other kung-fu aficionados out there could plausibly tell you that Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon was nothing compared to Snake in the Eagle's Shadow, Fist of Legend, or any number of other wuxia epics I haven't seen. Point conceded. Nonetheless, I found Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon a breathtaking movie experience. And, with Chow Yun-Fat, Michelle Yeoh, and Zhang Ziyi on hand, I'd put the acting (tho' not necessarily the martial arts) talent here up against any possible contender.

8. Before Sunset (2004)

As with Wong Kar-Wai's In the Mood for Love and 2046, I first saw Richard Linklater's Before Sunrise and Before Sunset back-to-back on DVD a few years ago. And, while Before Sunrise didn't do much for me (I'm guessing the problem is that I should have seen it back in 1995, when I was a more idealistic 21), I thought Before Sunset was stunningly good. (For this one, I was juuust right.)

Basically told in real-time one Paris afternoon, Before Sunset brings Jesse and Celine, the lovers of the first film, back together ten years after their fateful night in Vienna. As it turns out, one of them didn't show up for the romantic rendez-vous made at the end of Sunrise, which complicates things from the start. And, with ten years passed, both are now a little older and wiser in the ways of love. And by that, I mean they've become damaged, compromised, brittle, and gun-shy around each other.

Nonetheless, they shared something once upon a time in Vienna, and so they spend the next ninety minutes together -- getting up-to-date, confessing recent disappointments, licking old wounds. Life didn't turn out at all like they figured...and why is that, honestly? When and where did everything start to slip, and what might've happened if they had followed through on the promise made, and broken, ten years earlier?

In a way, there isn't much "movie" here at all -- It's just two old lovers, chatting for ninety minutes as they stroll about the City of Light. Still, Before Sunset is a powerful film if you let it work on you. Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy are both engaging and excellent, and not a false note is struck as each, slowly and almost despite themselves, lets their guard down around the other again. Ok, the great in media res ending of Sunset may veer a bit toward wish-fulfillment mode. But, y'know, why the heck not? After all this time, they still believe. (In fact, the ending to Before Sunset is remarkably like another film coming up...soon.)

7. No Country for Old Men (2007)

From the original review: ""Seen the arrow on the doorpost, saying, 'This land is condemned'..." Well, Bob, East Texas may seem rough, but trust me, West Texas is even worse. I'm always going to have a soft spot for Miller's Crossing, and The Big Lebowski is its own strange and beautiful beast, but the Coen Brothers' tense, brooding No Country for Old Men, which I caught this morning, is right up among their best work, and that is no small thing...[I]f you harbored any doubts about the Coens after their botched remake of The Ladykillers, fret not. The brothers are back in form."

From the year-end list: "[T]he Coens' expertly-crafted No Country works as both a visceral exercise in dread and a sobering philosophical rumination on mortality and the nature of evil. (And in his chilling portrayal of Anton Chigurh, Javier Bardem has crafted a movie villain for the ages.)...No Country for Old Men seems so seamless and fully formed, so judicious and economical in its storytelling, that it reminds me of Salieri's line in Amadeus: 'Displace one note and there would be diminishment, displace one phrase and the structure would fall.' A dark journey that throbs with a jagged pulse, No Country for Old Men is very close to the best film of the year, and -- along with Miller's Crossing, Fargo, and The Big Lebowski -- yet another masterpiece sprung from the Coens' elegant and twisted hive-mind."

"The crime you see now, it's hard to even take its measure. It's not that I'm afraid of it. I always knew you had to be willing to die to even do this job. But, I don't want to push my chips forward and go out and meet something I don't understand. A man would have to put his soul at hazard. He'd have to say, 'O.K., I'll be part of this world.'" The Coens' best film in a decade full of superior offerings, No Country for Old Men, as Matt Zoller Seitz eloquently argued in Salon last week, was a culmination of sorts for the brothers.

On its face, No Country is another sordid crime saga like Blood Simple or Fargo. But it's also, like Fargo, The Man Who Wasn't There, A Serious Man, and much of the Coens' oeuvre, a philosophical rumination on what propels people along the paths they choose. When Anton Chigurh flips a coin to decide Carla Jean's fate, who, really, is doing the deciding? Chigurh or the coin? "The coin don't have no say. It's just you." "Well, I got here the same way the coin did." Um, ok then. Is it Carla Jean, perhaps? After all, she could've picked tails. And, for that matter, Josh Brolin's Llewelyn could never have taken the money in the first place. In fact, as soon as he does, he starts referring to himself as a dead man...So he knew the score.

But then again, as Tom Reagan asks in Miller's Crossing, "Do you always know why you do things, Leo?" So maybe it was always out of their hands to begin with. After all, Ulysses Everett McGill's travels through the South in O'Brother are dictated by the Fates. The Dude...The Dude abides. And Anton Chigurh himself takes a side-impact car crash like he takes anything else -- It's simply the way things are. As another character reminds us in No Country, "You can't stop what's comin'." Or, to switch back to A Serious Man, that whirlwind's getting closer, and you can't stop it. So heed the words of the Jefferson Airplane, and find Somebody to Love...

The world of the Coens is all of a piece, and, for all its darkness, No Country is one of its purest expressions. (There's a good bit of overlap in the world of Cormac McCarthy as well. No Country ends with Tommy Lee Jones talking about a dream he had, one in which his father carries fire into the dark. A father "carrying the fire" also figures very prominently in The Road.) In the Coens' world, as in ours, the only predictable thing about life is that it is finite, so take things as they come and live it well. As Marge Gunderson puts it in Fargo, "There's more to life than a little money, you know. Don'tcha know that? And here ya are, and it's a beautiful day." Accept with simplicity everything that happens to you. Abide.

6. United 93 (2006)

From the original review: "Whether or not the world really needed a film about the events that took place on United Flight 93 the morning of September 11, 2001 is, I suppose, still an open question...That being said, having run the gauntlet earlier this week, I can now happily report that United 93 is magnificent, and arguably the best possible film that could've been made about this story. Both harrowing and humane, it's the movie of the year so far."

From the year-end list: "A movie I originally had no interest in seeing, Paul Greengrass's harrowing docudrama of the fourth flight on September 11 captured the visceral shock of that dark day without once veering into exploitation or sentimentality...While 9/11 films of the future might offer more perspective on the origins and politics of those horrible hours, it's hard to imagine a more gripping or humane film emerging anytime soon about the day's immediate events. A tragic triumph, United 93 is an unforgettable piece of filmmaking."

If ever there was a counterpoint to the cosmic shrug favored by Anton Chigurh, it can be found in Paul Greengrass' harrowing docudrama United 93. Here, as we all know, ordinary Americans refused to simply accept the dismal hand fate dealt them. Inasmuch as they could, the passengers of United 93 turned to face events square on -- They rose up, fought back, and, at the cost of their lives, saved the United States Capitol that Tuesday morning in September.

As I said at the time, I wasn't entirely sure a film should be made about United 93, particularly so soon after the events at hand. But, if a movie was ever going to be made about that flight, let it be this one. With clarity, conviction, and compassion, Paul Greengrass manages first to bring the horror and chaos of the day back to life here, in a way that is as non-exploitative as possible. (Unlike Oliver Stone's World Trade Center, which pretty much recreates the collapse from the inside, the initial impact on the towers here is shown merely as a blip on a radar screen.) And with the wave of fear and sheer confusion of that day vividly recreated -- you can feel it gnawing at your gut at this point -- Greengrass then lets the tale of United 93 unfold, so you really understand the dimensions of those passengers' heroism that day, a heroism borne of survival instinct and a horrible recognition of the stakes involved.

It really is an amazing achievement how well Greengrass threaded the needle here. While being respectful of those lost that day, United 93 works as both art and history. It doesn't go out of its way to demonize the terrorists or lionize the passengers -- he just lets their respective actions that day speak for themselves. (The fateful words "Let's roll,", for example, are muttered almost as an aside, and are all the more powerful for it.) In short, what could've been a needless and even offensive film in other hands became, under Paul Greengrass, an outright classic.

5. In the Bedroom (2001)

From the year-end list: "I can't remember another film this year that resonated so strongly. While I think last year's award hoopla erred too far toward the histrionics of Sissy Spacek and away from the nuanced performance of Tom Wilkinson, the moral center of the film, In the Bedroom nevertheless powerfully depicts how ostensibly 'good' people eventually find themselves contemplating and acting out evil deeds. Plenty of complex and memorable scenes throughout, such as Wilkinson watching the distracted guests at his son's funeral, or his pained attempt to forge a connection with Marisa Tomei, a woman he has nothing in common with except loss. A very, very good film that, if anyone has the stomach for a double dose of grief, bookends nicely with Atom Egoyan's The Sweet Hereafter."

Ok, 2006's Little Children was a bit of a dud. Still, In the Bedroom, based on the Andre Dubus short story "Killings," was an extremely auspicious debut for writer-director Todd Field, previously best-known for his small role in Kubrick's Eyes Wide Shut. With a strong sense of place -- in this case, a small Maine lobster-town, probably not too far down the road from various Stephen King short stories -- In the Bedroom is a powerful and morally complex study of how "good" people are, through rage, grief, and slowly curdling despair, eventually driven to dark deeds.

As I said above, Bedroom is a movie that resonates strongly in the details -- say, Tom Wilkinson eyeing his son's girlfriend (Marisa Tomei) with a combination of atta-boy pride and vague jealousy, or the nervous silence that descends around Wilkinson's usual poker table after his son's murder, or the way Wilkinson and Spacek tend to bury their grief -- and their eventual plot -- under mounds of everyday routine. More than most movies I can think of, In the Bedroom felt like a literary experience, one crafted by a filmmaker with a discerning, novelistic eye. So if any director can salvage something out of Cormac McCarthy's heavy-handed Old West Grand Guignol, Blood Meridian, it might well be Field -- It's slated for release in 2011.

4. The New World (2005)

From the original review: "[A] masterfully crafted tale of discovery and transformation, passion and misunderstanding, intimacy and heartbreak, love and loss, and worlds Old and New. In short, it's the best film of 2005."

From the year-end list: "A movie which seemed to divide audiences strongly, Terence Malick's The New World was, to my mind, a masterpiece. I found it transporting in ways films seldom are these days, and Jamestown a much richer canvas for Malick's unique gifts than, say, Guadalcanal. As the director's best reimagining yet of the fall of Eden, The New World marvelously captured the stark beauty and sublime strangeness of two worlds -- be they empires, enemies, or lovers -- colliding, before any middle ground can be established. For its languid images of Virginia woodlands as much as moments like Wes Studi awestruck by the rigid dominion over nature inherent in English gardens, The New World goes down as a much-overlooked cinematic marvel."

The best way to sum up Terrence Malick's achievement with The New World is to go back to the Gatsby quote I used in the original review: "For a transitory enchanted moment man must have held his breath in the presence of this continent, compelled into an aesthetic contemplation he neither understood nor desired, face to face for the last time in history with something commensurate to his capacity for wonder."

That's the extraordinary sensation at the center of Malick's film. I'm still not quite sure how he pulled it off, but The New World feels like arriving on the threshold of some strange, danger-ridden, and wondrous alien planet called...America. (Put another way, before Pandora, there was Jamestown.) The New World is a First Contact story that somehow manages to maintain the momentous portent of this historic moment, when Old and New Worlds collided. And, perhaps as impressively, it does it without taking sides. Half the time we're as inclined to side with Pocahontas and the sensible Powhatans, who, unlike the new, scurvy-ridden English arrivals, have the sense to prepare for winter (or at least to stop panning for non-existent gold when the frost sets in.) More than The Thin Red Line, more than Badlands, more even than Days of Heaven, I would say this is Malick's magnum opus.

3. I'm Not There (2007)

From the original review: "[T]o be honest, it's hard to imagine how this film plays to people who aren't all that into Dylan...But, if you do have any fondness for Bob, oh my. The short review is: I loved it. Exploding the conventional music biopic into shimmering, impressionistic fragments, Todd Haynes has captured lightning in a bottle here. The movie is clearly a labor of love by and for Dylan fans, riddled with in-jokes, winks, and nods, and I found it thoughtful, funny, touching, and wonderful. Put simply...I'm Not There is my favorite film of the year. I can't wait to see it again."

From the year-end list: "Admittedly, it was a wonderful confluence of my interests. Nevertheless, Todd Haynes' postmodern celebration of Bob Dylan, brimming over with wit and vitality and as stirring, resonant, and universal as a well-picked G-C-D-Em progression, was far and away my favorite film experience of the year. It seems to have slipped in a lot of critics' end-of-year lists...but so be it -- You shouldn't let other people get their kicks for you anyway. A heartfelt, multi-layered, six-sided puzzle about the many faces and voices of Dylan, l found I'm Not There both pleasingly cerebral and emotionally direct, and it's a film I look forward to returning to in the years to come. Everyone knows he's not a folk-singer."

"I was riding on the Mayflower when I thought I spot some land..." Speaking of the New World, welcome to Bob Dylan's Old, Weird America, here brought to life as the Halloweentown-like hamlet of Riddle, where Richard Gere hides out as the sixth and oldest Bob among us. Hiding, as always, right there in plain sight.

So, in retrospect, Todd Haynes' ode to the many facets of Bob Dylan probably turned out to be more inside baseball-ish than I originally assumed. I've since watched the movie with various folks who couldn't care less about the man, and they just found the whole enterprise weird, inscrutable, and mostly uninvolving. And, hey, if you're not feeling it, you're not feeling it. Still, for those of us who've imbibed the Dylan Kool-Aid (See also: J. Hoberman) Haynes' movie is a lovely gift, and way more intriguing than any standard-issue biopic I can imagine.

Basically, I adore this film. Each fragment of Bob here feels perfectly cast -- Marcus Carl Franklin as the impossibly talented wunderkind...and fake, Christian Bale as the take-no-prisoners true-believer with his finger-pointin' songs, Heath Ledger as the womanizing romantic and survivor of Blood on the Tracks, Ben Whishaw as the know-it-all, Rimbaudian interviewee, Richard Gere as the John Wesley Harding, Old Weird America Bob, and, of course, Cate Blanchett as the electric Blonde on Blonde non-blonde. Not to mention Charlotte Gainsbourg as Suze/Sara, Bruce Greenwood as Mr. Jones, Julianne Moore's riff on Joan's an embarrassment of riches here.

To me, I'm Not There is a fascinating, inspiring movie, one as much about Dylan's primordial American landscape as it is about the man from Hibbing, Minnesota. In defiance of the usual staid biopic routine, Haynes managed to create an ambitious, open-ended film that does justice to both a notoriously mercurial artist and his impressive body of work, one that deserves its place on the shelf right next to Dylan's music. So, yeah, I'm Not There may be preaching to the converted here somewhat. But as a member of the choir, I say press on, brother Haynes, press on.

2. The Lord of the Rings (2001-2003)

From the original review (FotR): "Post-Film Update: They did it! They pulled it off!"

From the extended edition review (FotR): "The Galadriel/Lothlorien stuff works much better now, with both Galadriel and Celeborn taking on the flavor of Tolkien's tome. Moreover, all of the underutilized members of the Fellowship - Boromir, Gimli, Merry, Pippen, and even Samwise - are given more characterization. And it just seems to take longer to get from place to place, which might take away from the film's dizzying pace, but definitely captures more of the feel of the book."

From the year-end list (FotR): " Suffice to say, it was everything I had hoped for and more. NOT for fanboys and fangirls alone - In fact, given its epic breadth and cinematographic sweep, I'd put it up as a worthy successor to the works of David Lean. Mr. Lucas, the bar has been raised."

From the original review (TTT): "After two showings yesterday, I must say I'm delighted and (still) surprised at how wondrous this second chapter turned out...[O]verall a deliciously good second installment in the Tolkien trilogy. And, with the ends of both the Isengard and Cirith Ungol storylines to be packed in with all the multitudinous events of ROTK, I see no way the next one can clock in under 210 minutes. Should be grand!"

From the extended edition review (TTT): "All in all, as with Fellowship, the extended Two Towers DVD includes a better, richer film loaded with tons of fascinating extras. If you're a fan, I'm sure you're getting it anyway...but if you're a casual Rings admirer, the TTT:EE is just as worth picking up as the FOTR:EE."

From the year-end list (TTT): "No surprise here. Although Fellowship may have delivered a bigger emotional impact, Peter Jackson and co. handled massive expectations with aplomb and deftly translated J.R.R. Tolkien's most unwieldy tome (Silmarillion notwithstanding) into the action-epic of the year."

From the original review (RotK): "Return of the King is an amazing conclusion to a trilogy that's surpassed all expectations and, I say this without hyperbole, redefined the medium -- From the technical breakthrough of Gollum to the seamless intertwining of jaw-dropping FX and character-driven emotion throughout, these films have expanded our vision of the possible and set a new standard for epic filmmaking."

From the extended edition review (RotK): "As with the FotR:EE and the TTT:EE, the Extended Edition is clearly a better film than the theatrical cut, with richer, denser characterizations, more Tolkien lore, and an improved sense of flow...All in all, RotK:EE, like its predecessors, is a wonderful gift to the fans of Tolkien and Middle Earth. And, although we have come now to the end, these three DVD sets (which look great on the shelf together) will now live on forever as a beacon of hope to fandom."

From the year-end list (RotK): "If you didn't see this pick coming, welcome to GitM...Even in spite of the pacing problems mandated by the TE running time, Return of the King is a marvel, the perfect ending to this epic for the ages and easily the best third-movie in a series ever. There's so many ways these films could've turned out atrociously...The fact that they didn't -- that they instead shattered all expectations while staying true to Tolkien's vision -- is a miracle of inestimable value. In the post-Star Wars age, when epics have been replaced by 'blockbusters,' and most event movies have been hollowed-out in advance by irony, excessive hype, dumbing-down, and sheer avarice, Peter Jackson has taught us to expect more from the cinema once again. Beyond all imagining, he took the ring all the way to Mordor and destroyed that sucker. So have fun on Kong, PJ, you've earned it."

"Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky. Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone. Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die. One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne, In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie. One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them, In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie."

If you get any goosebumps while listening to J.R.R. Tolkien read the last paragraph, then, you were probably like me at the start of this decade: looking for any news you could find about the forthcoming (live-action) movie version of The Lord of the Rings trilogy, directed by Peter Jackson of Heavenly Creatures, The Frighteners, and Bad Taste. On January 12, 2001, you probably also filed into the earliest possible performance of New Line's (very quality) Thirteen Days to catch the highly anticipated trilogy trailer.

And when December 19, 2001 at long last rolled around, you may too have buried your Phantom Menace butterflies deep down inside, took up what fanboy or fangirl standards you possessed (I myself wore the One Ring...on a chain, of course), and filed in to Fellowship to see what Jackson had come up with. At which point we -- you and I both -- were confronted with...blackness.

"I amar prestar aen, han mathon ne nen...The world is changed. I feel it in the water. I feel it in the earth. I smell it in the air. Much that once was is lost, for none now live who remember it." And just about right then and there, it was clear: Holy Sh*t! They did it!

Yes, there would be gigantic battles soon thereafter, massive CGI-enhanced affairs to rival the most vivid fever dreams of Led Zeppelin. And, of course, there would be elves, dwarves, and right twee little 'obbits. But the decision by Jackson, Fran Walsh, and Philippa Boyens to start their grand adventure with that sharp, Tolkienesque twinge of melancholy indicated right away that they had not been turned by the Nazgul of Hollywood, nor by the power of the effects at their disposal. Rather, they had stayed true to the sad and cautionary spirit of Tolkien's tale.

Do I have quibbles about Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings? Of course. Fellowship of the Ring is just about perfect to me, with the small-but-notable exceptions of Weathertop and the Ford at Bruinen. (Aragorn just should not be able to take out five Nazgul like that. And -- weirdly, given his horror background -- PJ somehow missed the real darkness of Frodo's turning after his Morgul wound: A growing part of him wants to go with the Riders. "Come back, come Mordor we will take you.")

And, as the story moves forward into The Two Towers and Return of the King, more minor problems emerge. (The "Choices of Master Samwise," Denethor's lack-of-palantir and the too-bright-by-half Shelob's lair, for example.) Plus, however anti-climactic and un-filmic, a strong argument can be made that the excised Scouring of the Shire -- nobody wins a war, the thing you fought for is destroyed by the fighting for it -- is half the point of Tolkien's tale...although I can see why it got left out.

But those quibbles aside, The Lord of the Rings was so much better than any of us really had any right to expect. In fact, the trilogy has so many secret weapons that it's hard to enumerate them all. There's the variegated natural beauty of New Zealand standing in for Middle Earth, as photographed by cinematographer Andrew Lesnie. (I would argue that the most powerful moments in the Fellowship prologue are those accompanied by simple nature shots: "Darkness crept back into the forests of the world. Rumor grew of a Shadow in the East, whispers of a nameless fear...")

There's Ian McKellen's turn as Gandalf, a performance that's almost impossible to imagine anyone else pulling off as well. There's the hauntingly beautiful music of Howard Shore, who was operating on another plane in these films. There was the art direction help by John Howe and Alan Lee -- two artists who had spent their lives dreaming up Middle Earth. With PJ, RIchard Taylor, and the enterprising elves of WETA, they helped bring Tolkien's words to life as never before. And, speaking of WETA, they and Andy Serkis brought us Gollum, a CGI-creation like none we had ever witnessed.

Ultimately, Lord of the Rings is the story of creatures, living long after the calamitous events that shaped their age, that now must face the End of their World. And, more than the calamity itself, the real story is about the characters' various responses to this time of testing. PJ et al got this. More than most films of its ambition, its crafters understood that emotional scale was as important as visual grandeur -- that, at its heart, the trilogy isn't so much about wizards and warriors as it is about friendship, the nature of evil, and persevering in dark times. And because they got that right, The Lord of the Rings is an epic unmatched in fantasy cinema before or since.

A final footnote: While the tone and thematic weight of the story is quite different, one hopes the old gang -- with their new Hobbit friend, Guillermo del Toro -- can bring about similar magic when they tackle "the incident with the dragon" in short order. The road goes ever stop, December 2011.

Speaking of which, here we are at the Crack of Doom at long last. So, to number 1 and the end of this Oughty Age...

1. The Hottie and the Nottie (2008)
A surprising heartwarming tale about body image and the perils of celebrity, The Hottie and the Nottie is...pretty obviously not on this list. To be honest, I never saw it. But I feel totally ok about presuming that it was an abomination in the eyes of the cinema Gods. Sorry, just seeing if anyone made it down this far. Ahem. #1 is in fact...

It's coming...

It is...

1. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

From the original review: "I thought Michel Gondry's Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind lived up to the hype and then some. One part Annie Hall, one part Sliding Doors, three parts Charlie Kaufman, Eternal Sunshine is an exceptionally strange take on the romantic comedy...(It probably helped that I tend to be a fan of almost all the folks at work here...Jim Carrey, Kate Winslet, Tom Wilkinson, Mark Ruffalo, Elijah "Bad Frodo" Wood, and David Cross...Sunshine is a fun, thought-provoking look at relationships and memory."

From the year-end list: "The one true classic of 2004, Eternal Sunshine has only grown in my estimation since its initial release in March. (David Edelstein's take on it as one of Harvard philosopher Stanley Cavell's remarriage comedies is well worth reading.) A heartfelt examination of love, loss, and memory, Eternal Sunshine was also a strikingly adult take on romance and relationships...With great performances from a caged Jim Carrey and an electric Kate Winslet, the film managed to be both an earnest, passionate love story and a wistful paean to those person-shaped holes we all carry in our hearts and memories...(Why even bother? We need the eggs.)"

"Happy is the blameless vestal's lot, the world forgetting by the world forgot. Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind! Each pray'r accepted, and each wish resign'd." That poem by "Pope Alexander" is the epigram of, in my humble opinion, the best movie of the decade. I first saw Eternal Sunshine, Michel Gondry and Charlie Kaufman's second collaboration after 2001's smart but very uneven Human Nature, in the stress-case period just before my orals exams, so I didn't give the film the review it deserved. (Although I tried to rectify that oversight some with 2004's end-of-year list.) Suffice to say, Eternal Sunshine is a masterpiece -- beautiful, heartfelt, incisive, and humane.

Like the best science fiction, Eternal Sunshine uses a sci-fi premise -- a friendly neighborhood clinic that can erase bad relationships for you -- to capture something elusive about our human condition, in this case about memory, love, and regret. Is it better to have loved and lost, or never to have loved at all? While various techs (Mark Ruffalo, Elijah Wood, Kirsten Dunst, Tom Wilkinson) handle the details of the medical procedure at hand (and conduct their own affairs of the heart), that's the question Jim Carrey's Joel wrestles with as he remembers -- one final time before the lights go off -- his days and nights with Kate Winslet's Clementine.

I'll concede that certain dream-elements of Eternal Sunshine don't quite work -- the baby-Joel under the table and in-the-sink stuff, for example. And you could argue, and some do, that all of the techie shenanigans outside Joel's mind are superfluous, although I enjoy them all the same (and, of course, they set up the final payoff involving the leaked tapes.) In fact, I tend to like the film's ragged, organic, and hand-crafted feel all around.

Still, the movie's real strength is its acute inquiry into the Ballad of Joel and Clementine (not to mention Joel-and-Clem, as a unit, and Joel's in-head Clem to boot.) And this is where Eternal Sunshine is dead-on and so often devastating. Note the perfectly-selected bric-a-brac stuff -- all the random, built-up detritus of a life together -- that Joel must collect and hide away forever to get his mind wiped. Or his gloomy gus, self-lacerating inner monologue when he first meets Clem on the Montauk train. Consider the moments that signify the end is near -- such as the usual jokes getting old, or that grisly conversation in the Chinese restaurant. And consider too the details Joel remembers and cherishes, like their trip to the frozen Charles, or that night they saw the elephants, or kissing under the sheets, or just Clem resting her cheek on his, one bright and lazy winter morning.

Given that the bottom eventually drops out, was it all worth it, in the end? Both Joel and Clementine have to answer that question with open eyes as Eternal Sunshine comes to a close. And this is where people tend to either find the movie dark and gloomy or legitimately romantic, in a way few movies are. I go the latter route -- Joel and Clem know what's 99.44% likely to happen this time: The same thing that happened last time. "I don't see anything I don't like about you." "But you will! But you will, and I'll get bored with you and feel trapped, because that's what happens with me."

And, yet, they take the plunge anyway, partly because the good times were good. Partly because love in the real world is never a meet-cute 'til the happily-ever-after anyway. It's negotiation, conversation, laughter, and crumbling defenses, a give-and-take process of two people slowly falling together. And partly because maybe, just maybe, the bad times were not inevitable, and things will break a different way this time. Screw Anton Chigurh --There's no fate but we make.

In all too many ways, from 9-11 to the Great Recession, the Oughts were ten years to forget. (And, on a personal level, it's safe to say I spent much of the past decade glum about one break-up or another.) But would we be better off forgetting the Oughts completely? Surely, there were flecks of gold throughout these past ten years, however dismal and Dubyaesque the decade often turned out to be. Regardless of how things pan out at the macro level, whether for good or ill, there are always small moments to cherish, days to remember fondly, and films to treasure. In fact, I've put one hundred of my own here. And of those, for me, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind shone the brightest.

So, we finally made it. That's the end of the list, folks, hope y'all enjoyed it. Fare thee well, gone away, there's nothing left to say.

Hey, wait a sec, that reminds me...

Special Award. The Wire (2002-2008)

From the series-finale review: "Pour a glass of Jamesons and give the devil (way down in the hole) his due: The Wire, a television show with a better claim than most to the title of "Best Ever" (and definitely the best show ever made about American politics), ends this evening...And you know the only thing better than having enjoyed all 60 hours of the show? Having never seen it at all. If that's you, pick up Season 1 and start from the beginning -- you're in for a real treat."

I'm not about to do a Best of the Decade TV retrospective here at GitM, partly because I don't feel like I watch enough TV to really judge. (Although, looking at other lists, it seems I caught a lot of the good stuff: Deadwood, Arrested Development, Six Feet Under, Mad Men, Breaking Bad, Battlestar Galactica, Curb Your Enthusiasm, The Sopranos, etc.) Besides, after this ridiculously extended movie project, I'll be damned if I feel like going to the pop-culture-nostalgia well again just yet. Still, call it a 60-hour-movie if it helps square the circle, but The Wire must get its props.

With a journalist's eye for detail and the gallows humor of good homicide po-lice, David Simon, Ed Burns, & co. used the rhythms of a cop show to hook us on an in-depth, comprehensive, and scathing diagnosis of life in the 21st century American body politic, as represented here by the failing city-state of Baltimore. Here, the Institutions are the new Gods, and people get crushed whenever they try to flout their dictates. In fact, people are worth less and less every day -- Because, wherever you are in the game, there's always someone else younger, hungrier, and/or less principled gunning for your spot.

That may sound heavy and edutainmentish, but it wasn't. Week after week, The Wire was also the funniest hour-long on television. It built, slowly, gradually, inexorably -- By the end of Season 1, I liked the show quite a bit but thought Deadwood probably edged it out in terms of quality. By the end of Season 3, I thought it was far and away the best show on television and was awestruck by its ambition. And we still had two more seasons to go.

David Simon and the gang eventually got so sick of being called "Dickensian" all the time that they turned it into a joke in Season 5: The Baltimore Sun is only interested in "the Dickensian aspect" of the streets, meaning simple, manageable problems that could be solved if, as per many Dickens tomes, only some highly convenient and thoroughly implausible Benefactor came out of nowhere to take the trouble.

Heh, point conceded. Still, as many others have noted, the term applies regardless. Just as Dickens brought industrial corruption and the plight of Victorian London's social underclass to life at the close of the 19th century, The Wire is the piece of journalistic fiction generations one or two hundred years hence will look to to understand the urban landscape of the Oughts. And more likely than not, then as it is now, the game will still be the game. Always.

Top 100 Films of the Decade: No-Frills Version

100. Dave Chappelle's Block Party.
99. SW: Revenge of the Sith.
98. Unbreakable.
97. Borat.
96. The Quiet American.
95. The Savages.
94. About a Boy.
93. The Matrix: Reloaded.
92. L'Auberge Espagnole.
91. King Kong.
90. Capote.
89. Star Trek.
88. Inside Man.
87. Munich.
86. Meet the Parents.
85. Sin City.
84. Bloody Sunday.
83. The Squid and the Whale.
82. Primer.
81. American Psycho.
80. Brokeback Mountain.
79. Drag Me to Hell.
78. Michael Clayton.
77. The Fountain.
76. The Fog of War.
75. The Queen.
74. Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy.
73. U2 3D.
72. Ocean's 12.
71. In the Valley of Elah.
70. Boiler Room.
69. Jackass.
68. Secretary.
67. (500) Days of Summer.
66. Lord of War.
65 Bamboozled.
64. Master & Commander.
63. Mystic River.
62. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.
61. Iron Man.
60. Batman Begins.
59. Good Night, and Good Luck.
58. District 9.
57. Wonder Boys.
56. The Man Who Wasn't There.
55. The Descent.
54. Ballets Russes.
53. Battle Royale/Infernal Affairs.
52. Zodiac.
51. 28 Weeks Later.
50. The Proposition.
49. The Bourne Trilogy.
48. The Prestige.
47. WALL-E.
46. The Royal Tenenbaums.
45. 24 Hour Party People/Control.
44. Coraline.
43. O Brother Where Art Thou?
42. Shaun of the Dead.
41. The Pianist.
40. Knocked Up.
39. Sideways.
38. Let the Right One In.
37. Intolerable Cruelty.
36. X-Men 2/Spiderman 2.
35. The Wrestler.
34. The Hurt Locker.
33. A Serious Man.
32. The Cooler.
31. Moon.
30. Requiem for a Dream.
29. Sexy Beast.
28. Milk.
27. Layer Cake.
26. Garden State.
25. Donnie Darko.
24. High Fidelity.
23. In the Mood for Love/2046.
22. The 25th Hour.
21. Mulholland Drive.
20. The Diving Bell & the Butterfly.
19. The Incredibles.
18. Memento.
17. In the Loop.
16. Traffic.
15. Lost in Translation.
14. Syriana.
13. Children of Men.
12. Letters from Iwo Jima.
11. The Lives of Others.
10. The Dark Knight.
9. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.
8. Before Sunset.
7. No Country for Old Men.
6. United 93.
5. In the Bedroom.
4. The New World.
3. I'm Not There.
2. Lord of the Rings.
1. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.
Special Award. The Wire.

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